Category Archives: Photos

Follow up to Dave Itzkoff’s NYT column about his 4 year old and home video, “Yellow Submarine & Me” .


Follow up to Dave Itzkoff’s NYT column about his 4 year old and home video, “Yellow Submarine & Me”  .

(I posted this as a comment on his greeting on Redit. Never been signed up on Redit before. I couldn’t send a message on Twitter and the letters section for the article was closed. I liked what he wrote, I hope he enjoys this additional info.)

Hi Dave, I’m Bill Abbott and I greatly enjoyed your NYT piece about “Yellow Submarine“. My kid, now 22, was also a big fan at that age. Great stuff! Same kid prefers “Help!” to “Hard Day’s Night”. Admittedly, “Help!” has more tigers, and the four attached home front doors leading to one room, with John’s bed below floor level. How I wanted one of those! Same kid offered a Nina Simone song as “what’s going through my mind now” this afternoon. I have no complaints.

Not long after “Yellow Submarine“, we were lucky enough to have another pre-schooler loan us a copy of “My Neighbor Totoro“. We didn’t know the film, didn’t know Miyazaki or Studio Ghibli. But we learned in a hurry! VERY kid friendly, and (spoiler) their mom is in the hospital but gets better! No Hollywood Movie disease! Totoro? You’ll meet the neighbor. You’ll be happy you did.

Then my brother loaned us a VHS of “The Way Things Go“. Its a 31 minuite Rube Goldberg machine made of industrial and consumer junk, in a disused factory setting. One thing knocks into a second, which tips a third, whick pulls a string, which releases a weight that falls on the end of a folded, partially inflated, vinyl boat, which unfolds, starting a tire rolling up (!) a ladder, which hits a second tire, starting it, and then a third, and a forth… you get the idea. Eventually the rhythms of the events , repetitions and variaions become identifyable, and after that, you start seeing the pauses where they had to reload the camera, every 3 minutes to 3:30 or so. I’ve probably seen it 100 times by now. When it ends, the delighted child says, “Again!” So always leave enough time to watch it twice.

Around age 5 or so, the family across the street loaned us a copy of “Spy Kids 2“. There were 3 “Spy Kids” movies, by Robert Rodriguez, and now there’s a fourth. We started with “Spy Kids 2”, because that’s what our neighbors loaned us, and they were right! Like “Night At The Museum 2“, “Spy Kids 2” explains nothing. There are characters. They have relationships. It will be come clear as it goes along. And there aren’t 30 seconds wasted in either film. “Spy Kids 2” has the great cast (Alan Cumming, Teri Hatcher, Cheech Marin, Danny Trejo, Tony Shalhoub.) of the first film, adding Ricardo Montalban and Holland Taylor as the Kids grandparents, on their mother’s side, a second Spy family, mom, dad, sister, brother, and Steve Beucimi as the mad scientist hiding in the volcano on the invisible island because he’s afraid of the creatures he’s created. Half to himself, he wonders “…if God hides in Heaven because He’s Afraid of what He created.”

“Spy Kids” explains everything, how the Kids parents (Antonio Banderas, Carla Gugino) work for the OSS, and the kid’s Uncle Machete built the tree house next to their house. You get more explanation about the Cumming and Shalhoub characters. Then truey odd stuff happens, big adventures, and it winds up ok. Takes a while, but OK. That’s nice but its not the one to start with.

Spy Kids 3” involves video games and Sylvester Stalone, not as successful in my opinion. ßtart with “2”, then watch “1”. Be happy.

If you liked “Totoro” then “Kiki’s Delivery Service” is a good second helping.

If you like “The Way Things Go“, there are two follow-ups, “Rendezvous“, “C’était un rendez-vous”, by Claude LeLouch, offers an 8 and a half minute, completely illegal, drive through Paris starting at about 5:30 am, so a man can meet his wife at Sacré-Cœur Basilica A “rendezvous”. They embrace in the headlights of his car. The whole thing is one shot, from the front of the car. What you see is the streets. The stop lights (they are red, the driver doesn’t even lift their right foot). Pidgeons. An early dog-walker, a trash truck. The route includes the courtyard of the Louve, because you used to be able to drive through it.

A second follow-up to “The Way Things Go” is “Rivers and Tides. Andy Goldsworthy Working With Time“. It starts with Goldsworthy up before the sun, in Newfoundland. He has a little cup of water and some icicles, which he breaks into short pieces with angled ends. He is using the water to glue them to a rock, then build a loop that goes out, curves, and returns to the rock. With one loop in place, he goes to the other end of the rock and makes tne next loop, higher. And back and forth. When he’s done, he steps back to take a photograph, and thats when the sun rises. The whole icicle “sewn” back and forth “through” the rock lights up like a Neon lamp. Like Steve Martin’s gag “arrow through the head”.

I had admired Goldsworthy’s work on exhibit around the Bay Area, and in books like “Hand To Earth”, but in the movie, you see an imperinant, temporal side of what he does. He builds something between the low tide and high tide mark, and the water rises and inundates it. He pins together bracken with thorns, and the little puffs of a light wind wrench it appart. All the rest of the film consists of wathching Goldsworthy go out into the wild world, make something with what he finds, take a picture, and leave it. And film of projects he did in the past. He narrates everything. Not every project succeeds. There’s a pinecone-ish shape he likes to build with stones, and he’s trying on a rocky shingle beach, and he hasn’t figured out how to use the rock. It keeps falling. Be talks about it while he works.

Another project is just jaw dropping. He’s drawn to the meandering shape of an old river on a nearly level plain, big loops that will be come oxbows, etc. He draws one in light snow on a frozen stream. He is offered a  wall in a gallery, and he builds a meander on it, using a soft, porus, material, and soaks it with water. Then he covers the whole wall with mud. So its a uniform, hand-smoothed, wall, entirely made of mud. And he lets it dry. Well, part of it dries quickly, there’s no water source under it. But part dries slowly, stays dark, and when it does, eventually dry, its immediately aparent where the meander is because the mud  that dried quickly has one characteristic set of cracking and the mud that dried slowly has a different looking cracking, and the two couldn’t be clearer in their difference. Although both are dried mud, the same dried mud. You can see the shape he wanted to show. How cool is that?

Image

Father’s day tides at Moss Beach:


Here’s the tide table for this coming weekend at Moss Beach, just north of Princeton By The Sea, at the north edge of Half Moon Bay. High tide, +6 feet, at Midnight between Friday and Saturday, 1:00am between Saturday and Sunday. Low, low, tides at 7:00am, -1.5 feet!! on Saturday, -1.25 feet, at 7:48am, Sunday.
So, by crackie, we’ll be there as early as we an on Sunday. Sunrise is before 6:00am, so no shortage of light. Do a web search and you’ll discover this place has the best tidepools that ever existed- perhaps 1/4 mile or more along the coast, as much as 200 yards off shore of the normal high tide mark. A huge shelf of very low quality rock, normally around or perhaps a bit below the 0 foot level, that will be a good foot above sea level on Sunday Morning.

Corrected captions for the Denver Post’s Plog of WWII in the Pacific.


Have a look at the well chosen pictures at the Denver Post’s Photo Blog or Plog. http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/03/18/captured-blog-the-pacific-and-adjacent-theaters/1547/

Sadly, the captions seem to have been either the intentionally uninformative wartime stuff, or edited to reduce meaning. I ended up with strong feelings about a bunch of the captions and sent them back the following suggestions. You may snicker knowingly if you please. I stopped after photo #19, and I tried to hit the meaningful stuff, and wound up sending them the following as comments. In each case I’ve put the photo caption and then my comment:

“2: December 7, 1941: This picture, taken by a Japanese photographer, shows how American ships are clustered together before the surprise Japanese aerial attack on Pear Harbor, Hawaii, on Sunday morning, Dec. 7, 1941. Minutes later the full impact of the assault was felt and Pearl Harbor became a flaming target. (AP Photo)”

Not to quibble but shore installations (Hickam Field) are already aflame, bombs have clearly gone off in the water of the harbor, torpedo tracks are visible and an explosion appears to be illuminating the third ship from the left, front row, the USS West Virginia. This photo is seconds, not minutes, from the full impact being felt. It is credited “Photo #: NH 50931” by the National Archives.

“4: December 7, 1941: The battleship USS Arizona belches smoke as it topples over into the sea during a Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The ship sank with more than 80 percent of its 1,500-man crew. The attack, which left 2,343 Americans dead and 916 missing, broke the backbone of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and forced America out of a policy of isolationism. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that it was “a date which will live in infamy” and Congress declared war on Japan the morning after. (AP Photo)”

The battleship USS Arizona had already sunk, on an even keel, as she still lies today, before this photograph was taken. Note the forward main gun turret and gun barrel, in the lower left. The forward mast collapsed, as shown, into the void left by the explosion of the forward magazine, which sank the ship. The flames are from burning fuel oil. The fires were not extinguished until December 8, so this picture may have been taken on the Day of Infamy, of the day after. Compare to official U. S. Navy photo Photo #: 80-G-1021538, taken on the 9th of December, after the fires were out, showing the forward mast in the same shape.

“9: April 18, 1942: A B-25 Mitchell bomber takes off from the USS Hornet’s flight deck for the initial air raid on Tokyo, Japan, a secret military mission U.S. President Roosevelt referred to as Shangri-La. (AP Photo)”

When asked where the US bombers that struck Japan on April 18, 1942 had flown from, President Roosevelt replied (humorously) “Shangra La”, an imaginary paradise invented by novelist James Hilton. He showed shrewd tactical sense, the imaginary location was placed on the Asian mainland, opposite the direction the B-25s had actually came from. The U. S. Navy later had an air craft carrier named the “USS Shangra-la”, making it the only US ship named after an imaginary place, work of fiction, or a presidential joke, your choice.

(not shared with the Denver Post – I built a model of one of the Doolittle raiders and posted this writeup about it: https://billabbott.wordpress.com/2009/03/13/building-itale…olittle-raider/)

“10: June 1942: The USS Lexington, U.S. Navy aircraft carrier, explodes after being bombed by Japanese planes in the Battle of the Coral Sea in the South Pacific during World War II. (AP Photo)”

The Battle of the Coral Sea is usually dated May 4–8, 1942, not June, 1942. This photograph must have been taken after 1500 (3:00pm) on May 8, and may be seconds after the “great explosion” recorded at 1727, 5:27pm. It is Official U. S. Navy Photo #: 80-G-16651. The USS Lexington was scuttled by US destroyer torpedos and sank about 2000, 8pm, that day.

“17: June 1942: Crewmen picking their way along the sloping flight deck of the aircraft carrier Yorktown as the ship listed, head for damaged sections to see if they can patch up the crippled ship. Later, they had to abandon the carrier and two strikes from a Japanese submarine’s torpedoes sent the ship down to the sea floor after the battle of Midway. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)”

Belongs directly after Photo 11, showing the damaged and listing USS Yorktown. The two photos were taken the same day, after the second Japanese air attack on the Yorktown, after noon, June 4, 1942. This is official US Navy Photograph #: 80-G-14384.

“18: Oct. 29, 1942: U.S. Marines man a .75 MM gun on Guadalcanal Island in the Solomon Islands during World War II. (AP Photo)”

75mm gun, not .75 (100 times bigger!). 75mm is slightly less than 3 inches. .75 would be slightly less than .030 inches, 1/10 the size of a “30 caliber” aka 0.30″ rife bullet. Given the short barrel, light construction and high elevation, its probably a howitzer and not a gun. “Artillery piece” might be more constructively ambiguous.

“19: October 16, 1942: Six U.S. Navy scout planes are seen in flight above their carrier.”

SB2U Vindicators were withdrawn from all carriers by September, 1942. Marine SB2U-3s operated until September, 1943, but only from land. The photo may have been released or dated October 16, 1942, but is unlikely to have been taken on that date.

(I’ve edited the original captions in for reference here – what I sent didn’t quote the captions, except for #18. I rebel at mumbojumbo like .75mm or .20mm, conflating the common “.(something)” inch dimensions for inch dimension ammunition with the dimension “mm”.

Generally “0.(something)” is the recommended format for dimensions, but “50 caliber”, “.50 caliber”, “.45-“, “30-” etc., clearly intersect with 75mm, 20mm or 9mm and produce a muddle in the mind of writers and editors…)

If the NRA really cared about educating people, they’d work on this issue.

What the People want:


So, for example, here’s what brought people to my blog yesterday:
More editing tomorrow.

— Information pointed to from here:
mosquito bomb aimers position 23
boeing 707 gray 2
hobby store bay area 2
dh mosquito

— Information here for airplanes and other subjects for modelling:
mosquito bomb aimers position 23

— Information here for paint and finishing:
boeing 707 gray 2
how to sand down excess plastic modeling 2
how to thin model master acryl paint 2
remove decals to model aircraft 1
tamiya paint sets 1spraying with water based paint 1
water based paint diluters

— Information here about Bay Area hobby shops
hobby store bay area 2
san francisco rc plane shop 1

“wwii” and “model kit” and “kids” 2
“air international” magazine index 1

dh mosquito cockpit door 1
grumman f7f tigercat/cabin view 1
1
radio shack electric motor rf-500tb-182 1
thinning water based paint for spraying 1
tamiya acrylic remover 1
dh mosquito 1
model paint stripping 1
and dilute acrylic paints for models 1-20 y 1
boac mosquito 1
removing future floor wax 1

I— nformation *not yet*here
italeri c 27 1/72 2
spray paint for pots and pans 1
système de trim wheel en cockpit 1
misquito twin engine bomber three view 1
revell constellation lufthansa blue tamiya colours 1
cockpit/grumman tigercat/images 2

Project status Minicraft 1/144 American Airlines MD-82 (?)


Wow, thanks for the vote based on not much!
here’s the state of play- needs antennae, bits and pieces markings:

Minicraft 1/144 MD-80, F-104J/G, Spitfire

Minicraft American Airlines MD-82
Minicraft 1/144 American Airlines McDonnell-Douglas MD-80
I’ve got a pile of home-made detail decals to put on the AA MD-82, and it needs antennae and lights

Project status Airfix 1/76 M4 Sherman


Airfix 1/76 M4 Medium – “Sherman” tank
All *kinds* of progress to report-
I’ve removed the not-straight bogie units from both sides of the hull, coincidentally making it easier to mount the tracks. I’ve fixed the broken or bent track return rollers and applied reddish-brown ‘rust’ to the rollers.

I laminated up the ‘bustle’ of the turret and then sanded it to match the plan from Steve Z’s book.

I had to put a ‘skin’ on the left side of the hull because it took a warp after being left in the car one day… There’s a lesson learned. When I was done, it looked and measured the same as the undamaged part on the right side…

Airfix "M4" Medium Tank, Sherman

Some of the bent styrene rod lifting eyes were not as successful as others: the port side forward and one of the aft eyes on the turret were completely bad. So I’m going to redo them.
I’ve drilled out the bad lifting rings. You can see the bad ones in this photo, and I promise, the bogies I removed were NOT straight…

Airfix M4 (Sherman) with improved turret, gun, return rollers and return skids.

Interior Colors for BN-2 Islander- Air Jamaica/Rockhopper, Augerny, others.


From bits and pieces of interior pictures of Islanders, this was my first take on interior colors:

-Headliner: White

-Glareshield above instruments: Black

Framing betwen two front windshield halves: Black or white

-Notably asymmetric instrument panel: all black or possibly gray in the middle with black on the outside thirds, where the actual flight instruments are.
There are at least three different instrument configurations- what I take to be the original, with the old RAF “Basic Six” IFR instruments in two rows of three, with two columns of piston engine instruments on the centerline and to the right of the centerline in the panel. Radios to the right of that, a black stripe going all the way down the pannel past the throttle/prop pitch quadrant in the middle.
A second configuration still had a basic six, sort of, in the center, sort of, but they were scattered about, not in neat files. Panels could be overall black or gray. What I take to be the newest panels have LED/LCD graphic displays on them for navigation and the later, messier, panel layout.

-The radio gear mounted to the right of center is black, but the panel is gray on some airplanes.

-Control yokes, black or gray. “Cafe racer” style, bare metal with black hand grips.

-Engine controls black quadrant box with black plain bare metal handles sticking out and a pair of shiny black knobs on the left, thebright blue pair in the middle and the bright red pair to the right.: Not unlike the 1968-1979 VW Transporter’s vents and heater control :^) One pair of knobs is more or less centered, the other pair is on the right hand side.

-Important-looking stuff fixed to the roof above the instruments- black or gray panel, one red and one green (or was that blue?) knob to the left and right of center. Function?… The Trislander has 3 of these knobs and they’re all green. Fire extinguishers?

-Fixed interior walls. White or very light gray

-Door interior faces: White, light beige. In some cases there’s a rubbing strip below the windows- Herringbone Tweed in one photo I saw.

-Seats. Medium blue cloth, or KLM-like light blue, with an Oxford (dark, maybe not quite “Navy” blue) leather or vinyl high wear protector, 1 piece, a semi-gloss rectangle on the flat medium Blue color seat. Bright yellow piping around wear guard

Dark blue with gold/beige/dark-yellow piping
OR Dark blue with a broad gold element woven into the fabric. Gold rectangles maybe 5mm X 15mm (.2″ X .6″) spaced 30 or so mm apart, edge to edge (so 45mm center to center), perhaps a bit closer to each other up and down. Something like:

__________#####__________#####__________#####__________#####
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
_____#####__________#####__________#####__________#####_____
__________________________________________________________
__________________________________________________________
#####__________#####__________#####__________#####__________

Does anyone have a concrete suggestion for what the interior colors of the Air Jamaica Isladers were, or what they were when the same aircraft were flying for Rockhopper?

If nobody has a suggestion, I’m going to go with blue upholstery, gray and black in the cockpit and light gray side walls and doors. White headliner, dark gray floor.

My conclusion is that the beige door interior would necessarily go with a beige/gold/darker brown upholstery, not the spiffy blue. Since the Jamaica Air planes start as basic white before the hot colors go on, and the Rockhoppers are overall blue, I figure a blue/gray/white interior can’t be too far wrong… unless Air Jamaica got the interior fabric to match their hot exterior colors! That would be something, yes 🙂

(T)F-104G paint colors:


http://www.arcforums.com/forums/air/lofiversion/index.php?t157600.html is a great discussion about Luftwaffe (post 1956…) (T)F-104G (and other air-to-mud strike aircraft) colors.

I was privileged to see and photograph the Marineflieger F-104 flight demo team in the 1980s, at Moffett Field, and there is no question in my mind that the underside color on their F-104s was a metallic tinged light gray. NOT bare metal, NOT aluminum lacquer, mostly light gray, but unmistakably containing aluminum powder too. This was when they had uniform dark gray on top, and the customary day-glo bands on the wingtip tanks.
I ought to scan those pix…

A nice guy named “Peepeing Bear” and a Jennings (OUR Jennings H from various airliner groups? Probably.) have a discussion at the arcforums site, and here’s what I take-away:

(T)F-104G, Luftwaffe:
Underside:
pre “Norm ’72” RAL 7001 Silbergrau (a light gray paint)
“Norm ’72” RAL 9006, a metalic + white + gray mix. Revell Germany give a formula of 10% Aluminum, 40% White and 50% light gray, in their 1/72 TF-104G kit.
RAL 9006 Weißaluminium (white aluminium) paint.

Later, “Norm ’83”. a green / green /grey wrap-around scheme replaced Norm ’72

The polygonal camouflage (RAL 6014/7012/9006) was only used for Marineflieger F-104s for a short time.

If you desire a rara avis. German Starfighter memorial photo website is a good place to look for specific photos.

A good and well-informed source on (Bundesluftwaffe) camouflage colours is the website of JPS Modell “Don Color”

A terrific place to compare RAL and BSC381C colors, on line:
http://www.e-paint.co.uk/RAL_Colourchart.asp?pType=&pFinish=
Standard disclaimers apply- its on line, not printed, so your monitory and ambient conditions will affect what you see, etc etc.

For Canadian colors (for Canadian F-104s… aka CF-104…), try:
http://hedgehoghollow.com/buzz/Colour_Guide/aircraft_clr.html

which seems to cover all Canadian military, before unification and after.
Looking at my FS 595A, I can take 26152 for 7012 and 24064 for 6014. I have some thoughts on which bluish gray off the shelf best matches 26152, and I’ll post results when I have them.

Jennings sez:
RAL 7012 Basaltgrau (FS 26152), RAL 6014 Gelbolive (FS 24064), RAL 7001 Silbergrau (FS 26320), and RAL 2005 Leuchtorange (FS 38903).

Mosquito cockpit photos on the web, links, descriptions


Lets talk about Mosquito cockpit photos on the web:
First, credit where credit is due:

http://www.mossie.org is a GREAT web site and this first group of photos are found there, and taken by Phil Broad, to whom we are all indebted!

http://www.mossie.org/Phil_Broad/Phil_Broad_Collection.htm

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-10.jpg
This color picture looks b&w- only the dark red, wheel-shaped, handle for the landing gear shows that this really is a color picture. The bomb-bay hydraulic control in this cockpit has a white knob, the flap handle is black. THe interior gray-green on the inside of the fuselage shell just looks gray. The hydraulic control levels are bare metal- plated steel, stainless steel or aluminum. The handles on the magneto switches look like bare aluminum.


http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-11.jpg
Looking down at the rudder pedals. The rudder pedal yokes and foot rests are black. The bare metal (probably plated or polished) twin hand pump for canopy de-icing system is visible, and the handles on the pump rods seem to be something more than just bare metal.


http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-12.jpg
Engine instruments, ventilator outlet, three knobs probably associated with dimmers, a white paper in a holder (Compass deviation card?)

The inner (right side) engine and propeller knobs are just visible- on this airplane they are shiny black with a large, whilte “P” which I take to mean Propeller (ie “Pitch”)

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-13.jpg
The prop feathering buttons are black and white, diagonal-striped,with small red markers in the middle. At the center-bottom, somewhat out of focus, you can see the Observer’s Oxygen Economizer, a black box- bakelite perhaps. with a light color (paper or aluminum) plate in the middle. The oxygen hose is dark gray or black, with light highlights or possibly a light color on the external spring wrapping. The grab handle above the passage to the nose compartment is light in this picture,

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-14.jpg
Almost everything is black with white details, and interior gray-green. In this view, the color details are the red covers on the two buttons for the IFF self-destruction equipment. and the red handle on the forward (ie left or port) radiator flap control. The destruct buttons are at the front edge of the big electrical box

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-15.jpg
More Observer’s sidewall and black boxes, black and white instruments, black cable wraps, bare metal connectors for the big cables, switch levers, etc. The forward (left/port) radiator flap control lever is red with a dark yellow knob, the aft (right/starboard) radiator flap control has a white lever with a dark yellow knob.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-16.jpg Pilot’s sidewall alongside the pilot’s seat. Mostly gray-green fuselage shell interior, with a black engine and propeller control box, black electrical boxes, black, white and gray wires and cables,, black and dark red placards (anodized?) The smaller black metal bit, aft, is the pilot’s intercom connection, there’s a dark reddish-brown covered receptacle hanging on a small cable from the nest of cables under the black metal piece. The clip at the front edge looks like its for the receptacle.

The larger electrical box is no remote radio channel push button selector.
There may be a dark red/brown center on the electrical control knob mounted just about the pilot’s armrest. I suspect the straight black tube mounted at the top of the sidewall, just below the canopy, is for the Bowden cable that leads from the rudder trim control (above the center of the instrument panel) back to the rudder trim tab

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-17.jpg
Same area as GMOS-16 but from above..Its easier to see what things are and how they work from a higher perspective

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-18.jpg
Looking down onto the engine and propeller control box, control yoke “Carbon Mic” hookup, pitch trim indicator, etc. Part of the engine instruments too. Placards, brackets, gauges, throttle box, levers, cockpit lights, etc, all black. Cockpit sidewall interior gray-green. Dark brown center on knob that’s probably a lighting dimmer.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-19.jpg
Looking aft at observer’s seat (a nice, dark brown shiny upholstery with modern belts, and no armor plate. Not exactly authentic 1940s. All structure interior gray-green, black panel for fuel cocks and engine cutouts. Fuel cock handles are black, cutout buttons are red. Black receptacle for observer’s headphones, hanging on a medium brown cable. Large multi-wire cables along observer’s side wall are covered in a glossy black material.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-20.jpg
Looking straight up at the canopy roof escape hatch- canopy metal framework is all interior gray-green inside, except for the actual hatch, which has a black frame, and the canopy frames that the hatch touches, which are all yellow.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-21.jpg
Low angle of pilot’s seat and sidewall. All seat structure is black, with black or very dark cushions. In this picture the engine supercharger instructions placard looks distinctly brown. Root Beer color. Photo-flash intense light and age are the likely cause.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-22.jpg
In bomb aimer’s station, looking forward, out the nose transparency. Everything is interior gray-green protective paint, except clear windows, a black rubber hose carrying dry air to the sandwich-construction bombardier’s “flat” window.


http://www.airmuseumsuk.org/museum/dhaircraft/800/images/012%20DH.98%20Mosquito%20B35%20cockpit.jpg

A pretty nicely restored B-35 cockpit. The condition of the trim wheel at the bottom of the column that supports the pilots instruments shows why I think this is a restoration. So its nice and clean and you’d like to hope the colors are mostly original, cleaned up, or touched-up/repainted with originals as references.


http://www.airmuseumsuk.org/museum/dhaircraft/800/pages/011%20DH.98%20Mosquito%20B35%20cockpit.htm

A nice view up past the pilot’s seat, showing the vacuum system control, details of the seat and its mounting to the bulkhead.


http://www.airmuseumsuk.org/museum/dhaircraft/800/pages/013%20DH.98%20Mosquito%20B35%20cockpit.htm

Here’s the pilot’s sidewall, showing trim indicator, engine and propeller controls, misc.. stuff.

http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/index.shtml

KA114
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Cockpit%20Box%20B%20KA114.jpg
This is a recently ( 2005) built fuselage in New Zealand, the second they produced. This electrical box looks very much like the photographs of 1940s production Mosquitos. I say we give them credit for getting the colors right, just as they so clearly got the shapes right.

<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Fuse%20@%20Avspecs.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Fuse%20@%20Avspecs.jpg

<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Nose%20browning%20doors%20off%20KA114.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Nose%20browning%20doors%20off%20KA114.jpg
This is a fighter-bomber (F Mk-26, XXVI) fuselage, with a slightly different rudder pedal box than the bomber version.

NZ2308 – a T Mk 43
<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Copy%20of%20Instrument%20panel.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Copy%20of%20Instrument%20panel.jpg

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This is a refurbished instrument panel, hydraulics, etc, from NZ2308

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The left side of this picture shows the bomb switch panels

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http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Original%20WT%20transmitter,%20reciever,%20VHF.jpg
Original radio transmitter and reciever.

<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/aviation.html “>http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/aviation.html
Phillip Treweek has hundreds of very, very nice images of historic airplanes- from in flight to in the bilges. Civil and military, new and old. Replica Fokker Dr-1s to F-111s and F/A-18s, major airliners.

<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/mosquito.html “>http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/mosquito.html

Philip Treweek’s photos:

NZ2305 F 40 converted to T-43, sold from Oz to NZ
<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/motadh98.html”&gt;
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/motadh98.html

NZ2328 FB6.
<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/fmead13.html “>
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/fmead13.html
Not hugely restored, photo looking aft from entrance. Cockpit is partially stripped, partially disassembled. Dirty gray-green. Intercom and related electrical stuff black with grey/beige cables. Fore and aft trim indicator is black. Control stick is black on both sides.area under the glare shield is interior gray green. Fuel cocks and one cutout button visbile, but not vaccuum control or whatever that other selector is. Engine control torque rods visible behind pilot’s seat.

<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/fmead14.html”&gt;
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/fmead14.html
looking straight across from entrance at instrument panel, stick, rudder pedals in same stripped/disassembled state as fmead14.html above. It looks un-restored or at least maintained as built, so wooden pieces are interior gray green, as is seat and related structure. Instrument panel faces are black, rudder pedal yokes are aluminum paint. Cable bundle running across behind the instrument panel is in white/cream wrapping, other cables black, gray, dirty silver? Tubing for instruments and controls is dull aluminum or silver paint. The handle of the control stick appears to be bare metal under a black finish which has worn and cracked off.

NZ2336 FB VI
<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith9.html”&gt;
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith9.html
Another un-restored, maintained as built example, and not as dusty or disassembled as NZ2328. Wooden structure is interior gray-green, rudder pedals silver paint, control column black, throttle box black, black levers including parts that stick out the bottom. Relay rods to engine control torque tubes appear to be interior gray-green. Push-button at aft edge of throttle box is either black or missing, I think missing. I’d expected red. Radio control box and compass case are dark gray, Radio box has black over silver id plate, centered, and gray cable that connects to the back. Radio box and throttle box have crinkle finish, semi-matte, unlike control column which is semi-gloss and smooth.

Dark redish brown floor under pilot’s feet, Dark gray leather(?) rubber(?) over moving parts the control column sticks up from, between dark red foot-boards. Elevator control rod from control column to elevator trim mix appears to be aluminum paint. Left most, larger, inner, friction adjust knob has aged to dark orange. Smaller, outer, right hand friction knob is black. Seat height adjustment lever is chipped black finish over natural metal, with bright red pushbutton at the top, push to unlock probably. Glycol de-icing fluid pump handle and body are shiny natural metal, Sanitary tank or possibly first aid kit under seat is interior gray-green over redish primer

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith10.html
Oh, pure gold! Observer’s sidwall, looking back and up from entrance.
Black electrical boxes. Black knobs and bell-shaped bases for… lamp dimmers? Black gauge and control on a black bracket at the lower back corner of the sidewall electrical box. Black electrical gizmo (terminal strip, ??) has receptacle for observer’s intercom. Dirty white cable bundles along sidewall, with darker brown discoloration like caramel stripe in ice-cream. Bare metal connectors where cables meet sidewall box. Gray individual wires in harness the dips down and then rises over entrance hatch. Dark gray oxygen hose. Wide yellow stripe over entrance hatch. Some sort of gray, crinkle finish metal box next to observer’s leg cushion- trailing antenna winch?
.

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith11.html
More gold, looking back at observer’s and pilot’s seats, with original-looking harness. Big radio box on shelf in back. Dark upholstery on observer’s cushions and pilot’s cushions- black or dark brown color. Original???

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith6.html
Inside of crew hatch- interior green, Beware of propellers red letters on white, solid yrllow latch handle, brown leather loop at top of door rib, etc

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith7.html
The compliment to #9, this shows the pilot’s side up to the canopy frame, seat, sidewall, etc. Wooden surfaces all int. gray-green, Prop knobs same orange as larger friction knob, control stick semigloss black, everything screwed to sidewall is black or dark gray. Tube that carries emergency harness release is light gray/translucent

http://www.kiwircraftimages.com/pages/smith8.html
Looking sligfhtly forward to the instruments and controls Interior gray green, black, dark gray.Orange knobs on throttle box, red prop feathering buttons, seat adjustment lever unlock button. Black, white, gray, wires and cables

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/mp00mos7.html
FB Mk VI NZ2336, Box B, various stuff on the Navigator/Observer’s sidewall- this is a GREAT photo- you can see the bare metal over what might be trailing wire antenna, I think I see a crank on it. The whiteish tubing that the various wire bundles are collected in is aging and discoloring, but very clearly a light color, with silver or natural metal connectors where they attach to Box B. There is also a dimmer and an instrument lamp, and a short cable with a 1/4″ female connector for the headphones/mic. AND the twin red buttons to destroy the IFF and/or radar key components (magnetron?)

Spitfire spares

Flickr Mosquito cockpit pix:
DH Mosquito cockpit shot
low angle view of whole instrument pannel. Very clear.

DH Mosquito cockpit shot LH instrument pane
Engine instruments, throttes and propeller control, stick, dimmers, compass.

DH Mosquito looking rearwards from navigator's seat
Navigator’s back armor, 1154 Transmitter/receiver, Direction finding looop hanging inside canopy.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lambda_nut/3904271707/in/set-72157622008359338/
This is a look down toward the rudder pedals, showing the low instrument panel, etc. You can see the wingnut and spool assembly that locks the two rudder pedals together to immobilize the rudder.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lambda_nut/3904282687/in/set-72157622008359338/
Full instrument panel, A fighter-bomber, I’d guess, since there’s the bomb interval stuff on the center pedestal, This is a really nice photo, of a possibly un-restored example.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/lambda_nut/sets/72157622008359338/

Lower instrument panel and obvserver’s side. Bomb controls, rudder pedals some kind of drift sight or other complex aparatus.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lambda_nut/3904298041/in/set-72157622008359338/
Nice view of a fighter version’s pilot’s sidewall, from compass back to the person sitting in the seat

These next two are (C) Andrew Critchell. The watermarks further say lRPS http://www.aviationphoto.co.uk
Dave Hall’s 1:1 scae Mosquito crew compartment replica. This is not an actua Mosquito, as you can see from the former rings in the bombardier’s compartment, and the absence of cables, hoses, rods, levers, etc. I think this is extremely cool and I’d love to experience it. But its like a big RC model or super detailed static scale model. You
can get an idea how the builder(s) think it should look. Not a primary source, but a secondary source for sure.

Monogram Fiero chassis, engine, suspension


Jean got me this Fiero kit as my Christmas model kit. Pretty cool. GM could never decide if this was the parts-bin special that had been sold to upper management or the sporty sports car it might have been. It did accomplish one major thing for the American automotive industry- the funny reaction-injection-molded plastic body panels never matched painted steel in quality of appearance, and the steel manufactuerers went to GM and said, how come you did that, and GM said, “You never talk to us about what we want”. And a dialog began.

Now here you can see what I was trying to accomplish: I used 4 or 5 different dark, dark, grays, mostly Polly S black with a touch of Polly S white. The shiny one is Testor’s Acryl “Semi gloss” black mixed 5:50 with Testor’s Acryl flat black, and the results lightened slightly with Testors Acryl Flat White. The basic chassis is the lightest tone I used. My theory is that the “flat black” used on an industrial scale for things like chassis is seldom dead flat OR a deep black.. Its dark enough you’d call it “black” but its not loaded with black pigment like a high quality black artist’s oil paint.

I took the liberty of painting the engine in my own ideas of good colors. I find the metallic silver-blue-green that Pontiac actually used as a corporate paint for engine blocks particularly uninspired. Sorry, Pontiac fans.