Category Archives: Metalic Paint

What the People want:


So, for example, here’s what brought people to my blog yesterday:
More editing tomorrow.

— Information pointed to from here:
mosquito bomb aimers position 23
boeing 707 gray 2
hobby store bay area 2
dh mosquito

— Information here for airplanes and other subjects for modelling:
mosquito bomb aimers position 23

— Information here for paint and finishing:
boeing 707 gray 2
how to sand down excess plastic modeling 2
how to thin model master acryl paint 2
remove decals to model aircraft 1
tamiya paint sets 1spraying with water based paint 1
water based paint diluters

— Information here about Bay Area hobby shops
hobby store bay area 2
san francisco rc plane shop 1

“wwii” and “model kit” and “kids” 2
“air international” magazine index 1

dh mosquito cockpit door 1
grumman f7f tigercat/cabin view 1
1
radio shack electric motor rf-500tb-182 1
thinning water based paint for spraying 1
tamiya acrylic remover 1
dh mosquito 1
model paint stripping 1
and dilute acrylic paints for models 1-20 y 1
boac mosquito 1
removing future floor wax 1

I— nformation *not yet*here
italeri c 27 1/72 2
spray paint for pots and pans 1
système de trim wheel en cockpit 1
misquito twin engine bomber three view 1
revell constellation lufthansa blue tamiya colours 1
cockpit/grumman tigercat/images 2

Project status Minicraft 1/144 American Airlines MD-82 (?)


Wow, thanks for the vote based on not much!
here’s the state of play- needs antennae, bits and pieces markings:

Minicraft 1/144 MD-80, F-104J/G, Spitfire

Minicraft American Airlines MD-82
Minicraft 1/144 American Airlines McDonnell-Douglas MD-80
I’ve got a pile of home-made detail decals to put on the AA MD-82, and it needs antennae and lights

(T)F-104G paint colors:


http://www.arcforums.com/forums/air/lofiversion/index.php?t157600.html is a great discussion about Luftwaffe (post 1956…) (T)F-104G (and other air-to-mud strike aircraft) colors.

I was privileged to see and photograph the Marineflieger F-104 flight demo team in the 1980s, at Moffett Field, and there is no question in my mind that the underside color on their F-104s was a metallic tinged light gray. NOT bare metal, NOT aluminum lacquer, mostly light gray, but unmistakably containing aluminum powder too. This was when they had uniform dark gray on top, and the customary day-glo bands on the wingtip tanks.
I ought to scan those pix…

A nice guy named “Peepeing Bear” and a Jennings (OUR Jennings H from various airliner groups? Probably.) have a discussion at the arcforums site, and here’s what I take-away:

(T)F-104G, Luftwaffe:
Underside:
pre “Norm ’72” RAL 7001 Silbergrau (a light gray paint)
“Norm ’72” RAL 9006, a metalic + white + gray mix. Revell Germany give a formula of 10% Aluminum, 40% White and 50% light gray, in their 1/72 TF-104G kit.
RAL 9006 Weißaluminium (white aluminium) paint.

Later, “Norm ’83”. a green / green /grey wrap-around scheme replaced Norm ’72

The polygonal camouflage (RAL 6014/7012/9006) was only used for Marineflieger F-104s for a short time.

If you desire a rara avis. German Starfighter memorial photo website is a good place to look for specific photos.

A good and well-informed source on (Bundesluftwaffe) camouflage colours is the website of JPS Modell “Don Color”

A terrific place to compare RAL and BSC381C colors, on line:
http://www.e-paint.co.uk/RAL_Colourchart.asp?pType=&pFinish=
Standard disclaimers apply- its on line, not printed, so your monitory and ambient conditions will affect what you see, etc etc.

For Canadian colors (for Canadian F-104s… aka CF-104…), try:
http://hedgehoghollow.com/buzz/Colour_Guide/aircraft_clr.html

which seems to cover all Canadian military, before unification and after.
Looking at my FS 595A, I can take 26152 for 7012 and 24064 for 6014. I have some thoughts on which bluish gray off the shelf best matches 26152, and I’ll post results when I have them.

Jennings sez:
RAL 7012 Basaltgrau (FS 26152), RAL 6014 Gelbolive (FS 24064), RAL 7001 Silbergrau (FS 26320), and RAL 2005 Leuchtorange (FS 38903).

Masking Tape, over a glossy finish, a sticky question.


My experience has been fairly good, using old-school beige masking tape, Scotch “Magic” (flat) transparent tape, 3M blue tape, or the light green 3M high stick tape. I prefer the 3M blue product. Scotch “Magic” tape can do really sharp lines on flat, smooth, surfaces, but it has no ‘stretch’. It won’t go around complex curves, stretch to fill engraved lines, etc. It can be hard to remove too, if you don’t leave an edge up somewhere.

First you need the base glossy paint to be well attached. Clean all the parts on their trees with Luke warm water and dish detergent, hand soap, light scrubbing with a green dish scrubber, light sanding with 600 or finer wet-dry sand paper, your choice. Do what’s worked for you in the past. Lay the paint down lightly and evenly. Keep the model parts warm enough before and after applying paint. Keep the paint warm too.

Having a gloss finish doesn’t require glossy paint. Future floor wax, gloss finish lacquers, gloss acrylic, gloss enamel, what ever’s right, after all the paint colors are in place, gives the thinnest finish.

If you’ve already got the glossy paint down and you’re wondering how to mask over it, there’s still plenty of little details to attend to.

Roughing the area the second color will go on doesn’t hurt- my problem masking is as much about the second coat not sticking on up to the masking line as it is about the first coat pulling off or separating.

Having a clean, fresh, edge with effective adhesive is VERY important. You can get along with the edges of the roll of tape as it comes from the maker IF its fresh and you just unwrapped or opened it. If the roll is a long term resident on your workbench, or the sides/edges are scruffy, its not going to make a clean, tight, line.

I keep my masking tape in a small zip-log bag now, stand it on its ‘tread’ instead of laying it on its ‘sidewall’, in or out of the bag. When I want a really crisp edge, I take a nice length of tape and my sharpest Fiskar scissors and cut the tape, straight, down the middle- this gives two, straight, sharp, edges. If I need a line longer than the length the Fiskar’s blades, I piece it from several pieces of tape, to make the edge, and fill with a second layer. I don’t overlap the joints, I trim the edges to slightly less than 90 degrees and lay the pieces down point-to-point, starting like:

1st color layer…
=====\/=====\/====
area for 2nd color.

Smallish filler pieces to cover the little triangular gaps are good. In general I find that small, narrow, pieces of tape are easier to use over curves (or to make curves!) than wide tape. I usually buy 1″ (25mm) and often cut it in half or thirds or quarters before I apply it. Getting a crisp edge is NOT the same as covering a large area- mark out the edges with narrow strips, then use full-width strips (or paper or plastic) to cover bulk areas. Yes, its hard to get long, straight, lines with narrower strips. Its hard to get long straight lines with big, wide, pieces too. Once its stretched out of shape, you’re better off throwing it away, or cutting it to the straight edge you need. Piecing out a long line in scissors-length pieces against a metal straight edge is possibly easier than applying a 2 foot (60cm) piece of tape…

Once the tape is down, burnish the edge, and any seams. Something smooth. slightly soft and gently curved like a Bic pen cap, orangewood stick, etc, is good. Fingertips work.

If you’re worried about stuff running under the tape (via deeply engraved panel lines, rough surface, whatever) dust a light coat of the base color or a clear to seal the edge of the tape. EASY does it, no blobs. Just enough to seal.

Now lay the second color down, in light, thin coats. More tape and a third color, etc, can follow. Using flat paint and not having to sand-down gloss finish for subsequent coats to stick to is clearly an advantage….

Some people like to lay a thick, wet, coat down and then lift off the masking as soon as the second color will stay in place… Ummm, that isn’t easy to do in thin, light, coats… Slicing along the tape edge with a brand-new knife blade is good, if you’re making a ‘straight’ line, a straight edge to slice along may help. Slice LIGHTLY, don’t go through the 1st color, or down into the base material of the model.

PEEL the tape, gently, slowly, pull AWAY from the masked edge. Peeling off the tape is a big part of getting a good masked edge. But like all human activities, it isn’t really true that there’s one and only chance, or that it can’t be fixed if there are problems. Personally, if I think any of the paint might still be wet (uncured) I shelve it and come back in a day or two.

But don’t heat something with masking tape on it, or leave it on the dashboard of the car on a summer day… Overheated tape stickum is a complete BEAR to remove. Ask me how I know…. After a year or two, the old, beige tape, stickum would vulcanize or cure or whatever you call it- become stiff and hard and require sandpaper to remove. The new, gentler, “blue” tapes are far more forgiving.

After the tape is off, there may be a ridge where a taped line was. Fine or extra fine fingernail sanding sticks, wet, are good for working down the ridge without losing the sharp edge. The stiff sanding stick is easier to control than a floppy sheet of sandpaper, and you only want to affect the stuff that’s sticking up.

Another reason to paint flat paint and gloss it later.

For natural metal finish with solid colors as well, I cover everything that will be bare metal and do the paint first, completely, including masking-ridge-sanding and the gloss coat, then tape off ALL the paint and spray Testor’s Metalizer (from rattle cans) over the bare plastic. So everything gets masked once, at least. (The airbrush-able Metalizer works just as well, and you can mix it and tint it, but I choose to use my time on other things.)

NEVER try to save materials when masking. Use fresh tape, use more tape, remove the tape and start over if you don’t like what you see. The tape is cheap, your time is expensive.

That said, don’t make your life harder than it needs to be. If you’re painting the tips of wings and rudder, mask the EDGES of the tips off, then cut some slits in a paper bag, and use the bag to cover all the model, except for the little bits you want to paint. Its not saving stuff, just making your life easier. Wrapping something completely in tape isn’t much fun, and risks overspray on gaps that require a lot of inspection to check.

Well, that went on too long, but you’ll have a good time doing multicolor paint and paint + natural metal. You can do the gray wings with polished leading edges, flat aluminum panels, satin finish engine intakes and maybe a titanium bit on the engine pylon.

Take a shot, take some pictures, let us know how it goes for you!

Monogram Fiero chassis, engine, suspension


Jean got me this Fiero kit as my Christmas model kit. Pretty cool. GM could never decide if this was the parts-bin special that had been sold to upper management or the sporty sports car it might have been. It did accomplish one major thing for the American automotive industry- the funny reaction-injection-molded plastic body panels never matched painted steel in quality of appearance, and the steel manufactuerers went to GM and said, how come you did that, and GM said, “You never talk to us about what we want”. And a dialog began.

Now here you can see what I was trying to accomplish: I used 4 or 5 different dark, dark, grays, mostly Polly S black with a touch of Polly S white. The shiny one is Testor’s Acryl “Semi gloss” black mixed 5:50 with Testor’s Acryl flat black, and the results lightened slightly with Testors Acryl Flat White. The basic chassis is the lightest tone I used. My theory is that the “flat black” used on an industrial scale for things like chassis is seldom dead flat OR a deep black.. Its dark enough you’d call it “black” but its not loaded with black pigment like a high quality black artist’s oil paint.

I took the liberty of painting the engine in my own ideas of good colors. I find the metallic silver-blue-green that Pontiac actually used as a corporate paint for engine blocks particularly uninspired. Sorry, Pontiac fans.

Testor’s spray paints, Tamiya, Krylon, Rustoleum and Ace Hdw house brand


Hey, I learned something!

Krylon and Rustoleum and even Ace Hardware spray paints come in bigger cans for about the same price as Testor’s little cans. And even with Testor’s expanded Model Master ranges, the big cans offer something like as many color choices if not more. Metallic and transparent colors too. The only area the model paints have a selection advantage is in metallics that look like specific metals- the Metalizer aluminum, titanium, steel, etc. And precise FS 595/a/b, BSC, RAF, IJN, etc, matches.

I made a bunch of samples of spray paint colors for a project, and ended up being able to compare various solvent based spray enamels, one lacquer, and whatever (lacquer??) Tamiya’s spray paint is. Krylon and Rustoleum spray paint smell similar and seem similar Ace Hardware’s house brand paint is pretty similar too. All dry to the touch pretty quickly and seem to be completely dry pretty quickly as well. You can smell their solvent system and its different from Testor’s.

Testor’s Model Master spray paint smells different and dries much slower. Its also MUCH thicker, and can make a single, shiny, coat in one pass. THAT’s the big difference. The Testor’s product minimizes the need to get the surface smooth and defect-free before painting. It will fill a certain amount of scratches and rough texture. “Conventional” spray paint is markedly thinner and quicker drying. It does NOT fill, or make a thick, shiny, coat.

This is not to say Testor’s product works automatically- you have to be alert and adroit to spray it well. Spray too little and it won’t fuse and you’ll get orange peel that way. Too much and it runs, ick! But if its shaken well, and sprayed lightly, correctly, the results are about as good as Santa’s elves could do.

The Testor’s products are very sensitive to how clean the spray nozzle is- dried paint that restricts flow will cause massive “orange peel” by making splatters rather than mist- the splatters don’t merge and flow into each other.

I also discovered that outlet and switch wall-plates make dandy paint samples. I’m never going to have to judge colors laid on cardboard again!

Lacquer dries even faster than the enamels, and Tamiya is somewhere in the middle.

We have a roll-around cart in the kitchen that holds the pots and pans and it needs painting. We just paid professionals to paint the whole downstairs and some of the upstairs, and had a pretty satisfactory process of picking sample colors, checking them under actual lighting conditions and making a final choice based on facts. With my sample switch plates, we settled on a color, and I’ll be sanding, priming, sanding again and then painting soon.

Glossy and flat paints and finishes


Two great questions brought people to my blog yesterday

1) How do you make a gloss paint have a matte (or matt or flat) finish?

a) You can top-coat it with a dulling finish- Testor’s DullCote laquer is the classic modeler’s tool, it is more or less clear but dries to a flat finish, with a microscopicly rough surface.  It comes in spray cans.  Some people spray it into a jar and then apply it with their airbrush for better control.

b) You can mix the Matte finish from the paint manufacturer into the paint before you apply it, or top-coat the paint with it (experiment with something not so important…

c) Krylon artist’s spray products or brushable matte finish for furnature.  One very good modeler I know uses water-based polyurathane matte and eggshell furnature finishes over everything.

If you use DullCote or Krylon, as always,  with any spray,  EASY DOES IT! Use light coats, don’t slather it on.  Since its a laquer, its very ‘hot’- the solvent will eat into anything and if applied too thickly over an enamel will probably wrinkle the enamel or worse. Not what you want. So build up light coats.

I can report two problems I’ve had and how I got around one of them, but I keep typing it in and it disappears, so not tonight.