Category Archives: Model Kit Review

Tamiya Porsche 911 GT1 kit: imperfections and repairs -Still Under Development!


Lets review: Tamiya’s 1996 Porsche 911 GT1 kit is mostly accurate, and concisely engineered. The 2 sides of the transmission each represent 6 or 7 pieces from the actual car, and the top and final drive piece also includes the rear suspension bulkhead, six space-frame tubes, rear suspension rocker bases and two adjustment knobs for the external shock absorber reservoirs.

But a few of the things provided aren’t quite what you see in pictures of the real thing. And a number of things in the pictures aren’t in the kit. In describing the kit I touched on The cooling air ducts for the rear brakes, and the breather catch tank.

Rear Brakes Cooling Air Scoops and Ducts:

The back of the scoop and ducts need to be made or bought. They should look like

naked .jpg URL: Displays image in moderate size, click takes one through to it. Maybe add height and width, or just one as part of this?

Link to a jpg URL: Displays the URL, not the thing the URL points to. Not worth it.
https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/images/car/3174/Porsche-911-GT1-48904.jpg

Image of a jpg URL: Displays a really large image, click does NOT link through. Big, but not worth it.
48904.jpg

naked .HTML URL: Doesn’t display image. Can be clicked through.
https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-48904.html

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-124487.html

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-124486.html124486

Catch Tank:

The catch tank can be re-worked to fix the shape problem. So lets start with what can be fixed or re-worked. Then the missing bits that need to made or found.

The catch tank should look like this: Rectangular. Top 2 pictures.

detail 2

Porsche Rohr 1996 911 GT1 
DSC_0133//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

If you haven’t seen Renaissance Model’s reference pages you’re in for a treat:

RM galerie de details:
https://www.renaissance-models.com/galerie_de_details.htm

RM Front Page:
https://www.renaissance-models.com/francais.htm

The front page is French/English, deeper in, French only.

Brake Disks
The carbon brake disks (380 mm diameter 37mm thick) are ventilated, by
round holes on straight radial lines. Rotating cutter? Formed by tooling? They follow a two-holes, space, one hole, space, two-holes pattern. My guess, 10 sets of 3.

In a picture showing < 180 degrees I count 14 holes. 2 X 14 = 28, but 28/3 is 9 1/3, not an even pattern. Symmetry around the disk seems likely to be important. The smallest number greater than 28 that is evenly divisible by 3 is 30.

007_00_GT1_left_rear_corner_D13a_john_sinkgraven_crop_holeCount//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Think of the 1 hole-space-2 holes-space pattern as 5 points, 3 of which are holes, 2 of which are not. 0-00- so the disc goes: 0-00-0-00-0-00-…If 10 sets of 3 holes, is right, 360 degrees/50 points = 7.2 degrees/point. 5 points = 36 degrees, 360/10.

Brembo’s web site:

https://www.brembo.com/en/company/news/formula-1-vs-lemans-2018

https://www.brembo.com/en/company/news/formula-1-vs-lemans-2018

lists 36 as the minimum number of cooling holes for GT1 brakes, in 2018.

Robert Muschitz’s marvelous photo:

Robert M again:

Porsche GT1//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

Brake disk calipers.
Brake disk calipers should have open backs, through which the pads should be seen. The kit parts have closed backs, but can be filed down to shape to expose the disk, and the pads, same radius. Mind you file for a curve.

A cardboard template from the rest of the disc would help. A brass-colored brace connects the two halves, at the back. Something to make, but not much. Stretched parts-tree polystyrene, metal wire, or mechanical pencil “lead” will suffice. Two “U” shaped wire bails cross the gap behind the pads and across the disk. Small steel wire, mini staples?

The wheels cover this area, but if you want to back off a wheel (or more) for an informal pose, some time on the backs of the calipers will be rewarded.

This should be a link:
<a href="http://Frame Grab from Callas RennSport Rohr Yellow Car front brake_caliper//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js” target=”_blank”>Frame Grab from Callas RennSport Rohr yellow car front brake caliper” https://www.flickr.com/photos/wbaiv/50231600796/

This should be an image but not a link

This should also be an image but not a link
The real thing:
fd7cc8...

Cold air to turbo inlet pipes.
Tamiya provide part A32, connected to the roof air scoop, with left and right takeoffs going to the turbo-compressors and the center going down through the air to air inter-cooler. Unfortunately, the two turbo-bound pipes on Tamiya’s part have a flat bottom, simplifying the mold, but changing the cross section of the pipe. Straight lines that should be curves are eye-catching.

Tamiya Porsche 911 GT1 filing & cleanup. Front of engine, serpentine belt, turbos, waste gates and air ducts,//embedr.flickr.com/assets/client-code.js

These photos show how it should look.

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-48904.html

48904

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-48905.html

48905

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-48906.html

48906

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-604.html

48904

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-124486.html

48904

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-14936.html

12436

flickr pix

https://i0.wp.com/farm6.staticflickr.com/5178/5418668794_fd7cc82416_b.jpg

Emphasize Division Between The Left and Right Inter-cooler Outputs.
Tamiya supply a single piece for both intercoolers, the ducts that take their outputs to the sides and the plenum “log”s that feed the throttle and injector for each cylinder. The division between the ducts on the two sides aren’t as clear as photos suggest:

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-603.html

603

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-14936.html

603

Remove One or Both Pairs Of Shock Reservoirs.
Tamiya provides a pair of shock reservoirs attached to the sides of the final drive. And a second pair attached atop the rear anti-roll bar housing. One place or the other was common for different cars at different times. Some shock reservoirs are seen attached to the diagonal tubes from the top of the transmission to the rear suspension bulkhead.

Other cars, other times, reservoirs are on top of the final drive housing, or on either side of the back end of the transmission. Or asymmetrically disposed somewhere across two of the places listed. There is clearly the potential for a table showing where the reservoirs were and whether gray metallic painted reservoirs and shock bodies, or red metallic paint painted sets were used. And what color for the springs. Indexed by chassis number and markings. More opportunities to excel!

GT1 109, gray metallic, reservoirs on diagonal tubes. Metallic / stainless braid hoses and banjo fittings. Glossy black springs. Glossy black three-bolt top of the spring. Black-red-black lower end stop.

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-14936.html

14936

GT1 104 Gray metallic, reservoirs on either side of the final drive. Aluminum colored cloth heat reflective wrap on hoses. Glossy, slightly darker red springs. Blue anodize banjo fittings. Black + silver / gold metallic three-bolt top of the spring. Red, Red, Black lower end stop.

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-124483.html

14936

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-124484.html

14936

GT1 101 Red metallic, reservoirs on carrier at back edge of final drive. Metallic braided hose or braid-like cloth.Semi-gloss black spring. White (silver) metallic banjo fittings. Dark Gray / Gray Blue on cone-shaped top of spring .

https://www.ultimatecarpage.com/img/Porsche-911-GT1-48904.html<img

14936

GT1 117 Red metallic, reservoirs at back edge transmission. Black rubber/vinyl hoses. Glossy dark red spring. White (silver) metallic banjo fittings. Dark Gray / Gray Blue anodize on cone-shaped top of spring. Black-black-black lower end stop.

2349/1997-Porsche-911-GT1-2.jpg

web post: Tamiya’s 1/24 Porsche 911 GT1 (993, 1996) kit described. #24186


This is the same text as a page I just constructed, but will be more easily found this way. Still figuring out how to format long form information.

Tamiya’s Porsche 911 GT1 represents the first year, 1996, factory racing cars that finished 1st and 2nd in the GT1 class, at Le Mans. This excellent debut was slightly bittersweet, the overall winner was a Porsche, but the previous generation, the 1995 World Sportscar Championship Prototype that Porsche had developed with Tom Walkinshaw Racing. but hadn’t raced. Long term Porsche customer Joest Racing borrowed the Prototype from the Porsche Museum, used the 962 engines they were familiar with, and beat the factory team! They would repeat this performance in 1997 as well.

Still, the 1996 GT1s did finish better than the McLaren F1s and every other manufacturer, as they were designed to do. Toyota, Nissan, Lister and Chrysler/Dodge GT1 efforts all came to naught, Mercedes Benz followed Porsche’s lead and produced purpose-built racing cars justified by a single streetable example. Porsche responded in kind, the factory team winning Le Mans overall in 1998 with their GT1 motor in a carbon-fiber Mk II chassis, while Mercedes Benz won most of the races other than Le Mans. The GT1 class was discontinued.

23 street versions of the 911 GT1 were built and sold to civilians, and apparently two of the customer racing cars were made street legal during recent restorations. So the idea of a road car that could compete at Le Mans wasn’t completely wrong.

Tamiya’s kit is molded in white, black and “chromed”, with an extensive decal sheet for the exuberant Mobil 1 sponsorship markings. Besides the 1996 factory Le Mans cars 002 and 003, and the bare carbon-fiber test mule 001, it can be marked as all but one of the customer racing cars, which were delivered with the first year bodywork. Only the last customer car was built with the 1997 “Evo” body, though most (but not all) were later converted for better aerodynamics.  “Evo”s can be recognized by their 911 (996) / Boxter common form headlight and turn signal assemblies. The Rohr team were notably successful with their round-headlight GT1 in yellow, as were the G-Force / Blue Coral team with their dark blue with black and yellow trim on chassis 101. Chassis 101 was originally in dayglo red and white, for cigarette sponsorship. Chassis 104 enjoys Larbre Compétition‘s busy FATurbo markings with round headlamps.

The kit has 21 construction steps, the first 9 for the engine, transmission and rear suspension, with 45 parts and 2 decals. 5 more steps (11-14 and 16), cover all 22 parts of the interior / driver’s compartment, except the 6 of the roof duct, body shell and clear parts.  Step 10 creates the front suspension, mounted on the front carbon fiber undertray. Along with the interior, step 11 crosses the length of the underside of the car, includes fixing the undertray and front suspension to the lower front chassis, adding radiator, nose air intake, and adding pivots for the engine cover.  Step 12 adds powertrain and rear suspension to the chassis, behind the firewall.  Step 15 is a pure play in paint and decals for the wheels, and slipping the tires on them. The last 5 steps, 17-21, build the body shell. A separate sheet shows how the Mobil 1 decals cover the body, most to be applied between steps 19 and 20. Other decals are applied in 9 other steps.

The decal sheet has 60 numbered images, and the kit has 132 parts, including a stretched part-tree radio antenna, 4 soft tires (with maker’s markings) and 4 soft-plastic “Poly caps” that pins molded inside the wheels plug into. Masks are provided to simplify painting the edges of the windshield and door windows semi-gloss black.

A clear body version was released later, but only front and rear body shells are clear, the aft edges of the front fenders, lower aft of the rear fenders, and rear fender air scoops are all white plastic. The roof scoop underside and single horizontal splitter are black plastic.

The crankcase, cylinders, and lower head, (intake and exhaust ports) are 2 pieces, split top and bottom, with reasonable molded-on top-of-engine coolant plumbing.  The transmission case is split left and right, with a third piece for the top of the case,  and final drive. Each bank of 3 cylinders has a separate cam box, intake and exhaust manifolds, exhaust and compressor turbines with restrictor air box, waste gate and bypass, exhaust tailpipe and tip, and compressed air pipe to the intercoolers. The two intercoolers and intake “logs” are a single piece shared by both sides, as is the air intake for the inter-coolers and turbo-compressors, and the engine front serpentine belt pulleys with oil and water header tank. The alternator, 3 piece oil tank and a mysterious small radiator behind the driver’s seat, complete the purely “engine” parts.

The talented part A34, the transmission top plate, concisely incorporates four space-frame “tubes” along a horizontal line, that link to horizontal “tubes” in the frame molded in relief on the back of the firewall.  They are really solid rods, but representing tubes on the real car. Indulge me. Another 2 tubes molded in the same part, carry the space frame back to the top of the transmission, and support the rear suspension spring and shock rockers. The broad, vertical, “bulkhead” that carries suspension loads directly to the space frame, first seen in the 956, are also included in part A34. Two additional “V” shaped tube pairs, A25 and A26, join vertical tubes in the frame on the back of the fireall, complete the 3d linkage of firewall tube frame and the rear suspension bulkhead.

Its probably a kindness that all this complexity is molded into one plastic part. Consider a loose bulkhead linked to the firewall by 4 loose V shapes. Not unlike building biplanes with wings and struts, and no 3D structures. Possible, but difficult. Nicer if the struts are long enough and strong enough to hold the wings in a fixed relationship. And absolutely depending on the geometry of the holes in the wing. Count on using the chassis bottom as tooling to hold the firewall and transmission in perfect alignment while the space frame to firewall joints are drying. Put plastic wrap or wax paper on the tray under the engine, and where the firewall would glue to the driver’s floor re-enforcement.

The rest of the rear suspension is equally concise, one piece for lower “A” arms. one piece for the upper parallel links, with a diagonal brace. The rear suspension push rod, rocker and spring/shock absorber are one piece for each side. Two sets of external shock absorber reservoirs are provided, one pair molded on the anti-roll bar cover and a second pair molded at the top front of the final drive, with ajustment knobs as part of A34.  The drive shafts are integral with half the rear hub. A separate “other half” makes a full hub, which locks between the lower and upper suspension arms and plus into the transmission final drive.

Structure is similarly concise: The tube frame that braces the exhaust pipes, contains the breather catch tank, holds both the air-jack connection point, supports the access for the externally adjustable anti-roll bar and serves as the lifting eye for the back of the car is 2 pieces, and a little bas-relief on the catch-tank, which is integral with the 2 sides of the transmission.

The radiator is supplied, the guide vanes for hot air that exits through the trunk lid, and the air intake in the nose, with lifting eye. But nothing else from inside the front body shell is provided. No radiator exhaust duct, front brake cooling ducts, stock 993 front chassis sheet metal, fuel cell and filler/vent hardware, or any of the fiddly suspension or fuel system bits.

The “chromed” parts should mostly be painted bare metal- aluminum for the air intakes, stainless steel for the exhaust. No clues are provided for the extensive hoses and cables that should dress the engine and transmission, the instruments, console controls and passenger seat area. A few details are wrong or misunderstood, but most detail is correct. There’s just a lot isn’t present.

The ugliest problem built into the kit as the inside of the rear brake cooling air scoops. It should be a large, rectangular cross section air duct on each side.  Instead, there’s a bizarre and inaccurate insert that makes a 90 degree turn in the airflow, then very odd “duct work” that assembles to join the 90 degree bend with a hard, white, plastic piece representing the “soft duct” that connects to the cooling air director on the rear hub. The soft pieces can be used The ducts and scoop fittings should not be used.

The next inaccurate detail is the catch tank. Its provided as a parallelogram, fore and aft edges parallel, top and bottom faces parallel, corners between them more or less than 90 degrees. The actual part is a rectangle, I’ve photographed it, its a translucent blow-molding, with a 930- (911 Turbo) part number and can be seen easily in engine compartments from 917s to 962s.

After that, the sins are mostly omission. Few of the cables and pipes/hoses in the engine compartment are provided or suggested, except for a bas relief drain tube on the catch tank. and an oil-return among the top-of-engine coolant plumbing. None of the cables in the passenger side of the cockpit.are provided or suggested. No engine management box, no Bowden cable from accelerator to throttle butterfly valves. No computer or power connector.  One fuel filter is on one intake manifold, but not the other, and the suggested injector rail and hoses are very poor and small.

Humbrol paint references for Airfix 1/72 McDonnell-Douglas / BAe Harrier GR7A-GR9A, kit A04050


Humbrol paint references for Airfix 1/72 McDonnell-Douglas / BAe Harrier GR7A-GR9A, kit  A04050
Humbrol paint numbers; paint names; steps,

11; Metallic Silver; 31, 37, 38,
53; Metallic Gunmetal; 6, 9, 11, 13, 14,
56; Metallic Aluminum; 10, 12,

14; Gloss French Blue; 3

24; Matt Trainer Yellow; 1
30; Matt Dark Green;  2
33; Matt Black; 2, 3, 6, 31, 35, 37
61; Matt Flesh; 2
155; Matt Olive Drab; 1
156; Matt Dark Camouflage Gray; 45
159; Matt Khaki Drab; 2

85; Satin Coal Black; 1
130; Satin White; 4, 7, 8, 23, 24, 25, 31, 33, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38,
165; Satin Medium Sea Gray; 2, 3, 4

– – – – – – – – – -========== * # * ===========- – – – – – – – – –

The Airfix instructions provide only Humbrol paint numbers for suggested colors. So I looked up the names and made a table of paints called out in the instructions, indexed by instruction page, construction step and color number. Its below, along with part numbers of what’s painted.

I’ve added some areas *to* color (ejection seat head box, breaking the seat cushion down into three different areas of color, for example) that seem non-controversial. They’re marked by a “- wba”. Airfix is not responsible for my contributions but I felt it was unfriendly to say nothing.

I don’t typically use Humbrol colors, so my next step will be cross-reference to the Polly Scale & Testors Model Master Acryl (II) acrylic colors. And Tamiya and Gunze Sangyo acrylics when they’re the better match.
Then I’ll add my own interpretation what additional areas should get attention. For example, ’24; Trainer Yellow;’ is called out for the parachute webbing/harness on the ejection seat head box. The actual color is a warm golden brown with a slightly metallic sheen- “Bronze” is one description. “Golden brown Martin Baker parachute webbing” would be my choice to name it.

Matt Black and Satin White are far to stark, in my opinion, so something lighter, and distinct, for black plastic, black painted metal, and tires, will be required, as will something duller for landing gear parts and bays, and the engine intake ducting. Stay tuned!

– – – – – – – – – -========== * # * ===========- – – – – – – – – –

Airfix 1/72 McDonnell-Douglas / BAe Harrier GR7A-GR9A
Page;  Step;  Paint;  Name;  Part no.;  Part name

3; 1; 85; Satin Coal Black; 20B 21B; ejection seat sides
3; 1; 85?; Satin Coal Black ;9B; ejection seat head box – wba
3; 1; ?; ;9B; ejection seat head box cushion – wba
3; 1; 24; Matt Trainer Yellow; 9B; ejection seat head box webbing
3; 1; 155; Matt Olive Drab; 9B; ejection seat back cushion
3; 1; 155?; Matt Olive Drab; 9B; ejection seat bottom cushion
3; 1; 155?; Matt Olive Drab; 9B; ejection seat calf cushion

3; 2; 30; Matt Dark Green; 14B; Pilot Helmet, lower garment
3; 2; 159; Matt Khaki Drab ; 14B; Pilot upper garment
3; 2; 33; Matt Black; 14B, 10C; Cockpit side consoles, Pilot Boot
3; 2; 61; Matt Flesh; 14B; Pilot face
3; 2; 165; Satin Medium Sea Gray; 10C; Cockpit bucket walls, floor

3; 3; 33; Matt Black; 3A, 27C; joystick grip, upper and lower instrument areas, left and right.
3; 3; 165; Satin Medium Sea Gray; 3A, 27C; joystick shaft, instrument panel blank faces
3; 3; 14; Gloss French Blue; 27C; CRT faces, left and right.

3; 4; 130; Satin White; 23A, 24; stbd & port forward fuselage nose gear well, Forward fuselage inner intake bulkhead
3; 4; 165; Satin Medium Sea Gray; 23A, 24; stbd & port forward fuselage cockpit sidewall

3; 6; 33; Matt Black; 28B; Engine intake behind fan…
3; 6; ?; ?; 28B; Inside of fan shroud – wba
3; 6; 53; Metallic Gunmetal; 29B; Engine fan – wba – titanium

3; 7; 130; Satin White; 51A, 52A; intake outer liners

3; 8; 130; Satin White; 15B, 3B; Main Gear well

4; 9; 53; Metallic Gunmetal; 23C,  25C; Port, Aft, hot, exhaust ducts

4; 10; 56; Metallic Aluminum; 19C, 21C; Port, Forward, cold, exhaust ducts

4; 11 53; Metallic Gunmetal; 24C, 26C; Starboard, Aft, hot, exhaust ducts

4; 12; 56; Metallic Aluminum; 20C, 22C; Starboard, Forward, cold, exhaust ducts

4; 13; 53; Metallic Gunmetal; 6A; Port, Hot exhaust shield

4; 14; 53; Metallic Gunmetal; 7A; Starboard, Hot exhaust shield

5; 23; 130; Satin White; (Step 5 output); Inner intake duct wall, starter/generator fairing

5; 24; 130; Satin White; 26A; inside of starboard outer intake duct;

5; 25; 130; Satin White; 25A; inside of port outer intake duct;

7; 31; 130; Satin White; 6B, 5B, 25B; Nose gear leg l&r, Nose wheel
7; 31; 33; Flat Black; 25B;  Nose tire
7; 31; 11; Metallic Silver; 6B, 5B; Nose gear leg l&r;

7; 33; 130; Satin White; 10B; Main gear forward door;

7; 34; 130; Satin White; 9C; Main gear leg;

7; 35; 130; Satin White; 26B, 27B; Main gear port & starboard wheel
7; 35; 33; Flat Black; 26B, 27B; Main gear port & starboard tire

7; 36; 130; Satin White; 43A, 44A, 41A, 42A; Nose gear bay port & starboard doors, Main gear port & starboard bay doors;

7; 37; 11; Metallic Silver; 31B, 30B; Outrigger gear oleo struts, port & starboard;
7; 37; 33; Flat Black; 31B, 30B; Outrigger gear tires;
7; 37; 130; Satin White; 31B, 30B; Outrigger gear legs, port & starboard;

8; 38; 11; Metallic Silver; 37A or 38A; Air Brake Hydraulic Cylinder
8; 38; 130; Satin White; 5A inside, 37A or 38A;  ; Airbrake, Air Brake Hydraulic Cylinder;

8; 45; 156; Matt Dark Camouflage Gray ; 23B, 24B; front of fired CRV-7 Rocket Pod.

– – – – – – – – – -========== * # * ===========- – – – – – – – – –

Humbrol paint numbers; steps:

24; Matt Trainer Yellow; 1
85; Satin Coal Black; 1
155; Matt Olive Drab; 1

30; Matt Dark Green;  2
33; Matt Black; 2
61; Matt Flesh; 2
159; Matt Khaki Drab; 2
165; Satin Medium Sea Gray; 2

14; Gloss French Blue; 3
33; Matt Black; 3
165; Satin Medium Sea Gray; 3

130; Satin White; 4
165; Satin Medium Sea Gray; 4

33; Matt Black; 6
53; Metallic Gunmetal; 6

130; Satin White; 7

130; Satin White; 8

53; Metallic Gunmetal; 9
56; Metallic Aluminum; 10
53; Metallic Gunmetal; 11
56; Metallic Aluminum; 12
53; Metallic Gunmetal; 13
53; Metallic Gunmetal; 14

130; Satin White; 23
130; Satin White; 24
130; Satin White; 25

130; Satin White; 31
33; Matt Black; 31
11; Metallic Silver; 31
130; Satin White; 33
130; Satin White; 34
130; Satin White; 35
33; Matt Black; 35
130; Satin White; 36
11; Matt Black; 37
33; Metallic Silver; 37
130; Satin White; 37

11; Metallic Silver; 38
130; Satin White; 38
156; Matt Dark Camouflage Gray; 45

– 30 –

Glad you asked: 1/32 model airplanes with working retractable landing gear. Working landing gear in general


Among the not so surprising list of searches that brought people to my blog, yesterdays list (below) included one dear indeed to my heart: “1/32 model airplanes with working retractable landing gear”

Ah yes, the great divide. Are we building scale models or toys? I come down firmly on the “toys” side, although many fine people I know personally are probably closer to scale modelers. I have to admit that almost any working feature of a model, particularly from a plastic kit, is going to compromise accuracy to some extent. Turning and propellers, wheels, maybe not so much. Opening doors, hatches? Mmmm, tricky. Retractable landing gear? Almost never truely ‘in scale’, but it HAS been done.

Personal experiences with working, retractable, landing gear:

1/32 Revell Supermarine Spitfire Mk I. Moving control surfaces and sliding canopy too.

1/32 Monogram North American P-51D Mustang. In “Phantom Mustang” or P-51 or F-51 form, this kit has retractable main gear and a tail wheel that are all actuated by turning a wheel on the belly. For the Phantom kit, an electric motor and gear train does the work. For the non-Phantom releases, the gear fixed to the plane becomes a knob to turn. Also comes with sliding canopy and bomb releases (again, under the belly for the controls in the pylon that the Phantom kit mounts on.)

1/32 Tamiya Mitsubishi A6M Riesen “type Zero” fighter. Tiny super-strong magnets are said to hold the moving pieces in place, and there’s a hidden socket for a crank to operate the gear… or so I have read.

1/32 Revell Grumman F4F-4 Wildcat. Not only retractable, the complex multi-link F3F and F4F setup that brought the wheels up to sit flush with the lower sides of the fuselage. I keep meaning to buy one of these and see how well it works…

1/32 planes that do NOT have working retractable landing gear:

1/32 Revell Hawker Hurricane I or “II” (its not a II and would take much effort- buy a 2 hand copy of the original Mk I kit if you want one of these…)

1/32 Revell Hawker/BAe Harrier / AV-8A. If I’d been in charge… but I wasn’t. Not retractible. The Airfix 1/24 kits has retractible gear, but other issues.

1/32 Revell Bristol Beaufighter. Alas, this would be a good place for a home-made setup, dead easy, but not the way they made the kit. Very much tooled to a price, with just about nothing in the fuselage (and no way to see it…) Still how cool is it to have this?!

Yesterday’s search terms.

x-4 bantam cockpit 2
light gull grey acrilico 2
islader 1/72 2
polly scale paints 2
tamiya u.s. interior green mix 2
thinning vallejo 26.526 1
mosquito de interior 1
how to dull the finish of a plastic model? 1
trislander 1
paint striper for plastic models 1
eclipse tptp vs netbeans profiler 1
water based model paint 1
bac 707 gray 1
hawk 75 cutaway 1
how long does it take to build plastic models 1
diluting water based paint for glaze 1
how to mix model paints 1
hobby shops in san francisco 1
“…the place god calls you to is the place where your deep gladness and the world’s deep hunger meet.” -frederick buechner 1
xf-56 1
tamiya spray paint solvents 1
future floor wax remover 1
building plastic model links 1
r/c car store in bay area 1
mosquito fuselage 1
elo easy lift off 1
sbd-5 camouflage 1
mosquito instrument panel 1
polly scale model railroads paints 1
airplanes painted black 1
who bought out hobby enterprises model airplane kits 1
deionized water acrylic paints 1
rc cars in bayarea 1
1/32 model airplanes with working retractable landing gear 1

Project status Italeri 1/72 F-104G/S Starfighter


Italeri F104 G ‘S’Here’s the latest- I took this and the Revell TF 104G on vacation with me. I’d made a drawing that cartooned the instrument panel, based on the Verlinden Lock On book primarily. With that sketch in hand, I painted both kit’s cockpits and fiddly bits, and started gluing, I’ve got this 104’s major fuselage assembled, with cockpit and intakes. Needs wings, aft fuselage attached, so forth. Paint too. Here’s the latest photo of it: Italeri F-104G/S its not actually an S, just a G, no Sparrow or Aspide missile, though there is a pylon for it at least. Interior parts cruder than Revell/Monogram/Revell Germany kit, I’ve painted in parallel. Going to build it as an S and to heck with getting the aft fuselage and intake trunk bulky-ness correct. With an AIM-7-ish missile on the pylon and pretty Italian markings it will look great. Big issue is getting something like but not TOO like British Ocean Gray/Mixed Gray and Dark Green for topside- each nation in NATO has its own paint scheme and the fact that they often resemble the Dark Green, Ocean Gray/Medium Sea Gray Day Fighter scheme from WWII European theater doesn’t mean that exact color matches are in stock.

Project status Minicraft 1/144 American Airlines MD-82 (?)


Wow, thanks for the vote based on not much!
here’s the state of play- needs antennae, bits and pieces markings:

Minicraft 1/144 MD-80, F-104J/G, Spitfire

Minicraft American Airlines MD-82
Minicraft 1/144 American Airlines McDonnell-Douglas MD-80
I’ve got a pile of home-made detail decals to put on the AA MD-82, and it needs antennae and lights

Project status Airfix 1/76 M4 Sherman


Airfix 1/76 M4 Medium – “Sherman” tank
All *kinds* of progress to report-
I’ve removed the not-straight bogie units from both sides of the hull, coincidentally making it easier to mount the tracks. I’ve fixed the broken or bent track return rollers and applied reddish-brown ‘rust’ to the rollers.

I laminated up the ‘bustle’ of the turret and then sanded it to match the plan from Steve Z’s book.

I had to put a ‘skin’ on the left side of the hull because it took a warp after being left in the car one day… There’s a lesson learned. When I was done, it looked and measured the same as the undamaged part on the right side…

Airfix "M4" Medium Tank, Sherman

Some of the bent styrene rod lifting eyes were not as successful as others: the port side forward and one of the aft eyes on the turret were completely bad. So I’m going to redo them.
I’ve drilled out the bad lifting rings. You can see the bad ones in this photo, and I promise, the bogies I removed were NOT straight…

Airfix M4 (Sherman) with improved turret, gun, return rollers and return skids.

Building Airfix’s 1/72 Britten-Norman BN-2 Islander: Interior references.


Lets say you’ve got one of Airfix’s BN-2 Islander kits, recently re-released by Hornby in a nice gray plastic instead of the yellow of the original, and you’d like to build it. Its got an interior, what color are you going to paint it? Here are some good photos and links to some great photos which are reserved and thus not visible here. I think these are some VERY high quality Islander and Trislander color photos, and I’m using them off the screen, no paper, as I build my kit Many, many, thanks to the photographers who kindly post their work, even if I can’t save a copy for myself. Seriously. I depend on you!

Here’s probably the most flattering photo of my model:

Pilot's seats are different shape than passenger seats

and the pieces before assembly:

Islander interior done, ready to assemble

Here’s the best photo of an Islander interior I’ve found, so far. Click through. It’s not shared, but its worth your time:
http://www.flickr.com/photos/_salvation/2638326095

Same sidewalls and headliner as the photo below, with bright yellow piping and Oxford Blue semi-matte rubbing surfaces inside the piping. Black seat belts with bare metal buckles.
The second row of seats has a lighter ‘medium blue” more like a KLM light blue. Just an indifferent match when they were reupholstered?

Here’s the second best Islander/Trislander interior that I’ve found, and it is shared. This is looking aft from the front rows: “Tim luxuriating” by tsallam, from Flickr
http://www.flickr.com/photos/annevoi/3244042691/

Headliner and down to the windows are very light gray, off-white, tweed? rubbing strip, a light beige, "cappuccino" below the window line. Flat Medium Blue seats,
LIfe raft and safety stuff behind the webbing in the back?

Islander/Trislander looking forward from the middle to back rows:
fms (4)

Same off white up high, medium blue gray rubbing strip and walls below that. Blue-gray seat covers. Instrument pannel is all black, some are gray

Blue Islands Trislander G-BEDP On Route To Bournemouth (EGHH
Blue Islands Trislander G-BEDP On Route To Bournemouth (EGHH)

Another off white up above, and a glorious blue ground with metalic gold on the passenger seats. Pretty!

Open doors:
DSCN0576_v

BN-2 Trislander OF Aurigny, G-FTSE , at Alderney, May 09 – by calflier001
GFTSE TRISLANDER OF AURIGNY AT AT ALDERNEY MAY09

Winair BN2A Islander PJ-BIW at St Barths Lesser Antilles Dutch west Indies – by calflier001
Winair BN2A Islander PJ-BIW at  St Barths Lesser Antilles Dutch west Indies

Cockpit, front seat row:
http://www.airliners.net/photo/Britten-Norman-BN-2-Islander/1427666/L/

Main Landing Gear, from inside the cabin, in flight:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/_salvation/2717326370/

Main Landing Gear, from inside the cabin, in flight:

Main Landing Gear, from inside the cabin, in flight:

Attractive Islander/Trislander gallery:
A Benyhone Tartain Islander:

(T)F-104G paint colors:


http://www.arcforums.com/forums/air/lofiversion/index.php?t157600.html is a great discussion about Luftwaffe (post 1956…) (T)F-104G (and other air-to-mud strike aircraft) colors.

I was privileged to see and photograph the Marineflieger F-104 flight demo team in the 1980s, at Moffett Field, and there is no question in my mind that the underside color on their F-104s was a metallic tinged light gray. NOT bare metal, NOT aluminum lacquer, mostly light gray, but unmistakably containing aluminum powder too. This was when they had uniform dark gray on top, and the customary day-glo bands on the wingtip tanks.
I ought to scan those pix…

A nice guy named “Peepeing Bear” and a Jennings (OUR Jennings H from various airliner groups? Probably.) have a discussion at the arcforums site, and here’s what I take-away:

(T)F-104G, Luftwaffe:
Underside:
pre “Norm ’72” RAL 7001 Silbergrau (a light gray paint)
“Norm ’72” RAL 9006, a metalic + white + gray mix. Revell Germany give a formula of 10% Aluminum, 40% White and 50% light gray, in their 1/72 TF-104G kit.
RAL 9006 Weißaluminium (white aluminium) paint.

Later, “Norm ’83”. a green / green /grey wrap-around scheme replaced Norm ’72

The polygonal camouflage (RAL 6014/7012/9006) was only used for Marineflieger F-104s for a short time.

If you desire a rara avis. German Starfighter memorial photo website is a good place to look for specific photos.

A good and well-informed source on (Bundesluftwaffe) camouflage colours is the website of JPS Modell “Don Color”

A terrific place to compare RAL and BSC381C colors, on line:
http://www.e-paint.co.uk/RAL_Colourchart.asp?pType=&pFinish=
Standard disclaimers apply- its on line, not printed, so your monitory and ambient conditions will affect what you see, etc etc.

For Canadian colors (for Canadian F-104s… aka CF-104…), try:
http://hedgehoghollow.com/buzz/Colour_Guide/aircraft_clr.html

which seems to cover all Canadian military, before unification and after.
Looking at my FS 595A, I can take 26152 for 7012 and 24064 for 6014. I have some thoughts on which bluish gray off the shelf best matches 26152, and I’ll post results when I have them.

Jennings sez:
RAL 7012 Basaltgrau (FS 26152), RAL 6014 Gelbolive (FS 24064), RAL 7001 Silbergrau (FS 26320), and RAL 2005 Leuchtorange (FS 38903).

Mosquito cockpit photos on the web, links, descriptions


Lets talk about Mosquito cockpit photos on the web:
First, credit where credit is due:

http://www.mossie.org is a GREAT web site and this first group of photos are found there, and taken by Phil Broad, to whom we are all indebted!

http://www.mossie.org/Phil_Broad/Phil_Broad_Collection.htm

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-10.jpg
This color picture looks b&w- only the dark red, wheel-shaped, handle for the landing gear shows that this really is a color picture. The bomb-bay hydraulic control in this cockpit has a white knob, the flap handle is black. THe interior gray-green on the inside of the fuselage shell just looks gray. The hydraulic control levels are bare metal- plated steel, stainless steel or aluminum. The handles on the magneto switches look like bare aluminum.


http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-11.jpg
Looking down at the rudder pedals. The rudder pedal yokes and foot rests are black. The bare metal (probably plated or polished) twin hand pump for canopy de-icing system is visible, and the handles on the pump rods seem to be something more than just bare metal.


http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-12.jpg
Engine instruments, ventilator outlet, three knobs probably associated with dimmers, a white paper in a holder (Compass deviation card?)

The inner (right side) engine and propeller knobs are just visible- on this airplane they are shiny black with a large, whilte “P” which I take to mean Propeller (ie “Pitch”)

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-13.jpg
The prop feathering buttons are black and white, diagonal-striped,with small red markers in the middle. At the center-bottom, somewhat out of focus, you can see the Observer’s Oxygen Economizer, a black box- bakelite perhaps. with a light color (paper or aluminum) plate in the middle. The oxygen hose is dark gray or black, with light highlights or possibly a light color on the external spring wrapping. The grab handle above the passage to the nose compartment is light in this picture,

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-14.jpg
Almost everything is black with white details, and interior gray-green. In this view, the color details are the red covers on the two buttons for the IFF self-destruction equipment. and the red handle on the forward (ie left or port) radiator flap control. The destruct buttons are at the front edge of the big electrical box

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-15.jpg
More Observer’s sidewall and black boxes, black and white instruments, black cable wraps, bare metal connectors for the big cables, switch levers, etc. The forward (left/port) radiator flap control lever is red with a dark yellow knob, the aft (right/starboard) radiator flap control has a white lever with a dark yellow knob.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-16.jpg Pilot’s sidewall alongside the pilot’s seat. Mostly gray-green fuselage shell interior, with a black engine and propeller control box, black electrical boxes, black, white and gray wires and cables,, black and dark red placards (anodized?) The smaller black metal bit, aft, is the pilot’s intercom connection, there’s a dark reddish-brown covered receptacle hanging on a small cable from the nest of cables under the black metal piece. The clip at the front edge looks like its for the receptacle.

The larger electrical box is no remote radio channel push button selector.
There may be a dark red/brown center on the electrical control knob mounted just about the pilot’s armrest. I suspect the straight black tube mounted at the top of the sidewall, just below the canopy, is for the Bowden cable that leads from the rudder trim control (above the center of the instrument panel) back to the rudder trim tab

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-17.jpg
Same area as GMOS-16 but from above..Its easier to see what things are and how they work from a higher perspective

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-18.jpg
Looking down onto the engine and propeller control box, control yoke “Carbon Mic” hookup, pitch trim indicator, etc. Part of the engine instruments too. Placards, brackets, gauges, throttle box, levers, cockpit lights, etc, all black. Cockpit sidewall interior gray-green. Dark brown center on knob that’s probably a lighting dimmer.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-19.jpg
Looking aft at observer’s seat (a nice, dark brown shiny upholstery with modern belts, and no armor plate. Not exactly authentic 1940s. All structure interior gray-green, black panel for fuel cocks and engine cutouts. Fuel cock handles are black, cutout buttons are red. Black receptacle for observer’s headphones, hanging on a medium brown cable. Large multi-wire cables along observer’s side wall are covered in a glossy black material.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-20.jpg
Looking straight up at the canopy roof escape hatch- canopy metal framework is all interior gray-green inside, except for the actual hatch, which has a black frame, and the canopy frames that the hatch touches, which are all yellow.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-21.jpg
Low angle of pilot’s seat and sidewall. All seat structure is black, with black or very dark cushions. In this picture the engine supercharger instructions placard looks distinctly brown. Root Beer color. Photo-flash intense light and age are the likely cause.

http://www.mossie.org/images/Phil_Broad/RS709_det/GMOS-22.jpg
In bomb aimer’s station, looking forward, out the nose transparency. Everything is interior gray-green protective paint, except clear windows, a black rubber hose carrying dry air to the sandwich-construction bombardier’s “flat” window.


http://www.airmuseumsuk.org/museum/dhaircraft/800/images/012%20DH.98%20Mosquito%20B35%20cockpit.jpg

A pretty nicely restored B-35 cockpit. The condition of the trim wheel at the bottom of the column that supports the pilots instruments shows why I think this is a restoration. So its nice and clean and you’d like to hope the colors are mostly original, cleaned up, or touched-up/repainted with originals as references.


http://www.airmuseumsuk.org/museum/dhaircraft/800/pages/011%20DH.98%20Mosquito%20B35%20cockpit.htm

A nice view up past the pilot’s seat, showing the vacuum system control, details of the seat and its mounting to the bulkhead.


http://www.airmuseumsuk.org/museum/dhaircraft/800/pages/013%20DH.98%20Mosquito%20B35%20cockpit.htm

Here’s the pilot’s sidewall, showing trim indicator, engine and propeller controls, misc.. stuff.

http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/index.shtml

KA114
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Cockpit%20Box%20B%20KA114.jpg
This is a recently ( 2005) built fuselage in New Zealand, the second they produced. This electrical box looks very much like the photographs of 1940s production Mosquitos. I say we give them credit for getting the colors right, just as they so clearly got the shapes right.

<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Fuse%20@%20Avspecs.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Fuse%20@%20Avspecs.jpg

<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Nose%20browning%20doors%20off%20KA114.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery02/Large%20images/Nose%20browning%20doors%20off%20KA114.jpg
This is a fighter-bomber (F Mk-26, XXVI) fuselage, with a slightly different rudder pedal box than the bomber version.

NZ2308 – a T Mk 43
<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Copy%20of%20Instrument%20panel.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Copy%20of%20Instrument%20panel.jpg

<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Copy%20of%20P1000973.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Copy%20of%20P1000973.jpg
This is a refurbished instrument panel, hydraulics, etc, from NZ2308

<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Bomb%20switch%20panels%20&%20elect.%20boxes.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Bomb%20switch%20panels%20&%20elect.%20boxes.jpg
The left side of this picture shows the bomb switch panels

<a href=”http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Original%20WT%20transmitter,%20reciever,%20VHF.jpg”&gt;
http://www.mosquitorestoration.com/cmscontent/Image/Gallery08/Large%20Images/Original%20WT%20transmitter,%20reciever,%20VHF.jpg
Original radio transmitter and reciever.

<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/aviation.html “>http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/aviation.html
Phillip Treweek has hundreds of very, very nice images of historic airplanes- from in flight to in the bilges. Civil and military, new and old. Replica Fokker Dr-1s to F-111s and F/A-18s, major airliners.

<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/mosquito.html “>http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/mosquito.html

Philip Treweek’s photos:

NZ2305 F 40 converted to T-43, sold from Oz to NZ
<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/motadh98.html”&gt;
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/motadh98.html

NZ2328 FB6.
<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/fmead13.html “>
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/fmead13.html
Not hugely restored, photo looking aft from entrance. Cockpit is partially stripped, partially disassembled. Dirty gray-green. Intercom and related electrical stuff black with grey/beige cables. Fore and aft trim indicator is black. Control stick is black on both sides.area under the glare shield is interior gray green. Fuel cocks and one cutout button visbile, but not vaccuum control or whatever that other selector is. Engine control torque rods visible behind pilot’s seat.

<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/fmead14.html”&gt;
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/fmead14.html
looking straight across from entrance at instrument panel, stick, rudder pedals in same stripped/disassembled state as fmead14.html above. It looks un-restored or at least maintained as built, so wooden pieces are interior gray green, as is seat and related structure. Instrument panel faces are black, rudder pedal yokes are aluminum paint. Cable bundle running across behind the instrument panel is in white/cream wrapping, other cables black, gray, dirty silver? Tubing for instruments and controls is dull aluminum or silver paint. The handle of the control stick appears to be bare metal under a black finish which has worn and cracked off.

NZ2336 FB VI
<a href=”http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith9.html”&gt;
http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith9.html
Another un-restored, maintained as built example, and not as dusty or disassembled as NZ2328. Wooden structure is interior gray-green, rudder pedals silver paint, control column black, throttle box black, black levers including parts that stick out the bottom. Relay rods to engine control torque tubes appear to be interior gray-green. Push-button at aft edge of throttle box is either black or missing, I think missing. I’d expected red. Radio control box and compass case are dark gray, Radio box has black over silver id plate, centered, and gray cable that connects to the back. Radio box and throttle box have crinkle finish, semi-matte, unlike control column which is semi-gloss and smooth.

Dark redish brown floor under pilot’s feet, Dark gray leather(?) rubber(?) over moving parts the control column sticks up from, between dark red foot-boards. Elevator control rod from control column to elevator trim mix appears to be aluminum paint. Left most, larger, inner, friction adjust knob has aged to dark orange. Smaller, outer, right hand friction knob is black. Seat height adjustment lever is chipped black finish over natural metal, with bright red pushbutton at the top, push to unlock probably. Glycol de-icing fluid pump handle and body are shiny natural metal, Sanitary tank or possibly first aid kit under seat is interior gray-green over redish primer

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith10.html
Oh, pure gold! Observer’s sidwall, looking back and up from entrance.
Black electrical boxes. Black knobs and bell-shaped bases for… lamp dimmers? Black gauge and control on a black bracket at the lower back corner of the sidewall electrical box. Black electrical gizmo (terminal strip, ??) has receptacle for observer’s intercom. Dirty white cable bundles along sidewall, with darker brown discoloration like caramel stripe in ice-cream. Bare metal connectors where cables meet sidewall box. Gray individual wires in harness the dips down and then rises over entrance hatch. Dark gray oxygen hose. Wide yellow stripe over entrance hatch. Some sort of gray, crinkle finish metal box next to observer’s leg cushion- trailing antenna winch?
.

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith11.html
More gold, looking back at observer’s and pilot’s seats, with original-looking harness. Big radio box on shelf in back. Dark upholstery on observer’s cushions and pilot’s cushions- black or dark brown color. Original???

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith6.html
Inside of crew hatch- interior green, Beware of propellers red letters on white, solid yrllow latch handle, brown leather loop at top of door rib, etc

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/smith7.html
The compliment to #9, this shows the pilot’s side up to the canopy frame, seat, sidewall, etc. Wooden surfaces all int. gray-green, Prop knobs same orange as larger friction knob, control stick semigloss black, everything screwed to sidewall is black or dark gray. Tube that carries emergency harness release is light gray/translucent

http://www.kiwircraftimages.com/pages/smith8.html
Looking sligfhtly forward to the instruments and controls Interior gray green, black, dark gray.Orange knobs on throttle box, red prop feathering buttons, seat adjustment lever unlock button. Black, white, gray, wires and cables

http://www.kiwiaircraftimages.com/pages/mp00mos7.html
FB Mk VI NZ2336, Box B, various stuff on the Navigator/Observer’s sidewall- this is a GREAT photo- you can see the bare metal over what might be trailing wire antenna, I think I see a crank on it. The whiteish tubing that the various wire bundles are collected in is aging and discoloring, but very clearly a light color, with silver or natural metal connectors where they attach to Box B. There is also a dimmer and an instrument lamp, and a short cable with a 1/4″ female connector for the headphones/mic. AND the twin red buttons to destroy the IFF and/or radar key components (magnetron?)

Spitfire spares

Flickr Mosquito cockpit pix:
DH Mosquito cockpit shot
low angle view of whole instrument pannel. Very clear.

DH Mosquito cockpit shot LH instrument pane
Engine instruments, throttes and propeller control, stick, dimmers, compass.

DH Mosquito looking rearwards from navigator's seat
Navigator’s back armor, 1154 Transmitter/receiver, Direction finding looop hanging inside canopy.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lambda_nut/3904271707/in/set-72157622008359338/
This is a look down toward the rudder pedals, showing the low instrument panel, etc. You can see the wingnut and spool assembly that locks the two rudder pedals together to immobilize the rudder.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lambda_nut/3904282687/in/set-72157622008359338/
Full instrument panel, A fighter-bomber, I’d guess, since there’s the bomb interval stuff on the center pedestal, This is a really nice photo, of a possibly un-restored example.


http://www.flickr.com/photos/lambda_nut/sets/72157622008359338/

Lower instrument panel and obvserver’s side. Bomb controls, rudder pedals some kind of drift sight or other complex aparatus.

http://www.flickr.com/photos/lambda_nut/3904298041/in/set-72157622008359338/
Nice view of a fighter version’s pilot’s sidewall, from compass back to the person sitting in the seat

These next two are (C) Andrew Critchell. The watermarks further say lRPS http://www.aviationphoto.co.uk
Dave Hall’s 1:1 scae Mosquito crew compartment replica. This is not an actua Mosquito, as you can see from the former rings in the bombardier’s compartment, and the absence of cables, hoses, rods, levers, etc. I think this is extremely cool and I’d love to experience it. But its like a big RC model or super detailed static scale model. You
can get an idea how the builder(s) think it should look. Not a primary source, but a secondary source for sure.