Monthly Archives: January 2011

Corrected captions for the Denver Post’s Plog of WWII in the Pacific.


Have a look at the well chosen pictures at the Denver Post’s Photo Blog or Plog. http://blogs.denverpost.com/captured/2010/03/18/captured-blog-the-pacific-and-adjacent-theaters/1547/

Sadly, the captions seem to have been either the intentionally uninformative wartime stuff, or edited to reduce meaning. I ended up with strong feelings about a bunch of the captions and sent them back the following suggestions. You may snicker knowingly if you please. I stopped after photo #19, and I tried to hit the meaningful stuff, and wound up sending them the following as comments. In each case I’ve put the photo caption and then my comment:

“2: December 7, 1941: This picture, taken by a Japanese photographer, shows how American ships are clustered together before the surprise Japanese aerial attack on Pear Harbor, Hawaii, on Sunday morning, Dec. 7, 1941. Minutes later the full impact of the assault was felt and Pearl Harbor became a flaming target. (AP Photo)”

Not to quibble but shore installations (Hickam Field) are already aflame, bombs have clearly gone off in the water of the harbor, torpedo tracks are visible and an explosion appears to be illuminating the third ship from the left, front row, the USS West Virginia. This photo is seconds, not minutes, from the full impact being felt. It is credited “Photo #: NH 50931” by the National Archives.

“4: December 7, 1941: The battleship USS Arizona belches smoke as it topples over into the sea during a Japanese surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, Hawaii. The ship sank with more than 80 percent of its 1,500-man crew. The attack, which left 2,343 Americans dead and 916 missing, broke the backbone of the U.S. Pacific Fleet and forced America out of a policy of isolationism. President Franklin D. Roosevelt announced that it was “a date which will live in infamy” and Congress declared war on Japan the morning after. (AP Photo)”

The battleship USS Arizona had already sunk, on an even keel, as she still lies today, before this photograph was taken. Note the forward main gun turret and gun barrel, in the lower left. The forward mast collapsed, as shown, into the void left by the explosion of the forward magazine, which sank the ship. The flames are from burning fuel oil. The fires were not extinguished until December 8, so this picture may have been taken on the Day of Infamy, of the day after. Compare to official U. S. Navy photo Photo #: 80-G-1021538, taken on the 9th of December, after the fires were out, showing the forward mast in the same shape.

“9: April 18, 1942: A B-25 Mitchell bomber takes off from the USS Hornet’s flight deck for the initial air raid on Tokyo, Japan, a secret military mission U.S. President Roosevelt referred to as Shangri-La. (AP Photo)”

When asked where the US bombers that struck Japan on April 18, 1942 had flown from, President Roosevelt replied (humorously) “Shangra La”, an imaginary paradise invented by novelist James Hilton. He showed shrewd tactical sense, the imaginary location was placed on the Asian mainland, opposite the direction the B-25s had actually came from. The U. S. Navy later had an air craft carrier named the “USS Shangra-la”, making it the only US ship named after an imaginary place, work of fiction, or a presidential joke, your choice.

(not shared with the Denver Post – I built a model of one of the Doolittle raiders and posted this writeup about it: https://billabbott.wordpress.com/2009/03/13/building-itale…olittle-raider/)

“10: June 1942: The USS Lexington, U.S. Navy aircraft carrier, explodes after being bombed by Japanese planes in the Battle of the Coral Sea in the South Pacific during World War II. (AP Photo)”

The Battle of the Coral Sea is usually dated May 4–8, 1942, not June, 1942. This photograph must have been taken after 1500 (3:00pm) on May 8, and may be seconds after the “great explosion” recorded at 1727, 5:27pm. It is Official U. S. Navy Photo #: 80-G-16651. The USS Lexington was scuttled by US destroyer torpedos and sank about 2000, 8pm, that day.

“17: June 1942: Crewmen picking their way along the sloping flight deck of the aircraft carrier Yorktown as the ship listed, head for damaged sections to see if they can patch up the crippled ship. Later, they had to abandon the carrier and two strikes from a Japanese submarine’s torpedoes sent the ship down to the sea floor after the battle of Midway. (AP Photo/U.S. Navy)”

Belongs directly after Photo 11, showing the damaged and listing USS Yorktown. The two photos were taken the same day, after the second Japanese air attack on the Yorktown, after noon, June 4, 1942. This is official US Navy Photograph #: 80-G-14384.

“18: Oct. 29, 1942: U.S. Marines man a .75 MM gun on Guadalcanal Island in the Solomon Islands during World War II. (AP Photo)”

75mm gun, not .75 (100 times bigger!). 75mm is slightly less than 3 inches. .75 would be slightly less than .030 inches, 1/10 the size of a “30 caliber” aka 0.30″ rife bullet. Given the short barrel, light construction and high elevation, its probably a howitzer and not a gun. “Artillery piece” might be more constructively ambiguous.

“19: October 16, 1942: Six U.S. Navy scout planes are seen in flight above their carrier.”

SB2U Vindicators were withdrawn from all carriers by September, 1942. Marine SB2U-3s operated until September, 1943, but only from land. The photo may have been released or dated October 16, 1942, but is unlikely to have been taken on that date.

(I’ve edited the original captions in for reference here – what I sent didn’t quote the captions, except for #18. I rebel at mumbojumbo like .75mm or .20mm, conflating the common “.(something)” inch dimensions for inch dimension ammunition with the dimension “mm”.

Generally “0.(something)” is the recommended format for dimensions, but “50 caliber”, “.50 caliber”, “.45-“, “30-” etc., clearly intersect with 75mm, 20mm or 9mm and produce a muddle in the mind of writers and editors…)

If the NRA really cared about educating people, they’d work on this issue.

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How to set up work space (directories) for software development:


How to lay out a work space for software development:

Q: Why not use
/Users/yourNameHere/blah.blah – everything in the login directory?

A:Its messy, impractical hard to export.

Requirements for a software development workspace:

  1. Makes it easiest to do things the ‘right’ (you choose ‘right’) way.
  2. Source files and support stuff can easily be version-controlled: using a third party tool (Perforce, etc) or informal methods (numbered revisions in a “History” or “Rathole” or per-file subdirectory below the working directory, etc.
  3. Environment neutral: Easily exported to someone else’s environment (Some people don’t value this- I like to send out examples that arrive workable and sometimes I ask others for help. If you don’t need that, by all means have a big alias file and a bunch of stuff in /bash_profile… But do consider packaging all of that stuff so you, yourself, can move from system to system, OS to OS…)
  4. Scalability: One file, 100 files, 100,000 files (i.e, no bottom)

I’ve seen a bunch of somewhat thoughtlessly assembled setups at a variety of work environments. Back in the mists of time, at Lomac, in 1979, we didn’t have password protection on our 8 inch floppy environments (RT-11 for PDP-11/03, and CP/M for S-100 Z-80s). Easy stuff. Boot up and, on a build disk, there it all was. (WERE there subdirectories in RT-11 and CP/M?, Google knows…)

At Perforce, the Performance Lab used a nice organization of:

/Users/yourNameHere/- anything and everything, but no production stuff here.

Installed stuff, supported by two additions to PATH

export PATH=$PATH:/Release/namedRelease_*:/Work/yourNameHere/namedRelease_*:.

This then became:
/Releases/namedRelease_1/usualTopLevel
/Releases/namedRelease_1/usualTopLevel/bin
/Releases/namedRelease_1/usualTopLevel/etc
/Releases/namedRelease_1/bin
/Releases/namedRelease_2/usualTopLevel
/Releases/namedRelease_2/usualTopLevel/bin
/Releases/namedRelease_2/usualTopLevel/etc
/Releases/namedRelease_2/bin

Database location:
/db/namedRelease_1/
/db/namedRelease_2/

Leading with a named release allows Path to mix and match generically named 3rd party tools. Like Source Control Management…

Project work:
/Work/yourNameHere/namedRelease_1/
/Work/yourNameHere/namedRelease_2/

and if you absolutely, positively, have to work in /Users…
/Users/yourNameHere/namedRelease_1a
/Users/yourNameHere/namedRelease_3b

What NOT to do:

The “namedRelease_*” paths looks unnecessary, up to the time you need to maintain two parallel developments. You can keep one in /Releases/usualTopLevel/… and one in /Users/yourNameHere/usualTopLevel but its all too easy to get to:
/Releases/usualTopLevel/…
/Releases_1/usualTopLevel/…
/Releases/usualTopLevel_2/…
/Users/yourNameHere/usualTopLevel/…
/Users/yourNameHere/usualTopLevel_A/…
/Users/yourNameHere_2/usualTopLevel/…

and having to hand edit these irregular paths here, there and everywhere. Ask me how I know. 🙂

And what I plan to do here at home:

/Work/Bill4/rel_1/
to start with. Its pretty light weight. just took a few minutes to set up.