Monthly Archives: April 2010

My de Havilland Mosquito cockpit drawings:


Mosquito Pr/B Mk IV cockpit and nose This is the set of drawings, on Flickr

de Havilland 98 Mosquito B Mk IV Cockpit Port side 12

My Mosquito crew compartments port side drawing

Mosquito Cockpit Stbd, colored - in

My Mosquito crew areas starboard drawing

My Mosquito from seats forward cockpit drawing

My Mosquito cockpit nose-on drawing

/4332165664/in/set-72157623358284910/”>Forward view (as if looking forward from the wing spar)
Aft view (into the nose transparency)

de Havilland Mosquito cockpit colors


Painting done. See white 'eastc cords'? Port side

Mosty done, touchups needed port cockpit

Port side pilot's and nose compartment detailed in paint.

RAF Interior Green/Gray: (Fuel and hydraulic-fluid-proof)
– All structural surfaces in cockpit, bomb bay and wheel wells.
– Inside of doors, hatches, covers, etc.
– Seats.
– Wooden brackets for flares, ksvacuum flas and portable oxygen bottles.
– Wooden box around rudder pedals, vertical yokes of rudder pedals
– Lower portion of control yoke/joy-stick, pushrod to elevator control, etc.
– Inside of canopy framing,
– Roof of nose compartment,
– Shelf, bulkhead and walls behind seats

Black/Dark Gray
– Pilot's instrument panels,
– Control wheel/yoke ("joy stick"), upper part.
– Large instrument and control boxes on the observer's sidewall,
– Radios and radio-related (motor generator, etc) stuff behind the seats,
– Engine and propeller control box on pilot's sidewall,
– Compass case,
– Oxygen economizers, indicators and controls
– Sanitary tank and tube,
– Some of the bomb-aiming equipment in the nose of glass-nose variants.

Various other black/dark gray colors:
– Instrument faces,
– Control boxes and fiddly bits on both sidewalls and on the wing spar.
– Radio cables

Red:
– fire/rescue axe on starboard sidewall in bomb-aimer's nose?
– Prop feathering buttons on control box to the right of instruments
– Forward crank for radiator flap positioning
– Knob/indicator for fuel valve on main spar
– Cross on first-aid box under pilot's seat
– Band on cardboard tube containing red flare
-"Danger" area markings on some instruments
– Some knobs and controls on radios
– Engine instrument surround for oil temperature. Top of the three rows of color-surrounded engine instruments on lower left of pilot's instrument panels.

Green
– Knee and elbow cushions in bomb aimer's compartment
– arm rests on pilot's seat
– Observer's seat cushions
– Band on cardboard tube containing green flare
– "Safe" area marked on some gauges

Yellow
– Engine instrument surround for (fuel pressure?) – middle row of the three rows of color-surrounded engine gauges.
– Some knobs and controls on radios
– (with black stripes) release handle for entrance hatch, emergency hatch in canopy, dinghy release
– Some of the twin knobs on the engine control box.

Blue
– Engine instrument surround for (water temperature) instruments. The bottom of the three rows of color-surrounded engine gauges on the lower left corner of the pilot's instruments.
– Some knobs and controls on radios

Mosquito scrap cockpit drawings

Mosquito bomb-aimer's compartment

port and starboard halves, floor, radio rack, instrument panel, in progress

White
Aft crank for radiator flaps
Various placards and lists in cockpit
First-Aid box under pilot’s seat
White band on white flare cardboard tube

Dark Red – raised floorboards for pilot

Dark reddish-brown metallic (oxidized copper) Hand fire extinguishers

Clear finished wood? Navigation table stowed on Starboard sidewall.

Cream/beige/brown/gray
– Vacuum flask holder retainer bungee cord.
– flare holder retainer bungee cord
– observer’s parachute retainer bungee
– Portable oxygen bottle retainer bungee

Black/brown leather:
– blade holder and handle strap for fire axe
– Observer’s sidewall pocket for flare pistol.

Buff/beige cardboard tube:
Each cartridge for the flare pistol was packed in a cardboard tube. A colored band around the tube indicated the color of the flare. The usual quartermaster and production information was printed in the usual black ink.

Beige/light gray/off white: I’m not sure what material this is.
Cover over the wire bundles that run from the aft bulkhead to the various control boxes on the observer’s sidewall, forward into the bomb aimer’s compartment and across the roof of the same to the back of the instrument panel.

Khaki/army green canvas
– Various cockpit sidewall and bomb-aimer’s compartment pouches, pockets, etc.

“Engine Controls and propeller controls”:
The engine control box has two levers outboard, on the far left, which have round, black, knobs. There are two levers inboard, on the far right of the quadrant, which have square, often orange yellow, handles. The quadrant itself seems black, with bare aluminum trim and placards, and a red button on the inside (toward the pilot) at the back end.
I presume those colors correct for 1941-1945. I wonder, is the yellow-orange for real? I assume so.

Mosquito starboard side, instruments

Mosty done, starboard cockpit

During the painting of the interior

My Mosquito crew areas starboard drawing

Getting directory contents from inside Java


I went searching for an example, found:
http://www.javafaq.nu/java-example-code-120.html
which shows several different ways to display content- everything, directories only, filter by string. I added a toy user interface so I can play with it interactively, resulting in a new main method:

public static void main(String[] args) {

String target = “//”;
String filter = “”;

if (args.length == 0) {
System.out.println(“java ListFilesSubs [first char(s) filter]”);
} else {
if (args.length > 0) {
// Call the simple file listing method
target = args[0];
doSimpleFileListing( target );
} // if args.lenl > 0

if (args.length > 1) {
// Now do the file listing but pass in a String to filter the file list
filter = args[1];
doFileFilterListing( target, filter );
} // if args.lenl > 1

// Now do another example that only prints out the directories
doFileFilterDirectoryListing( target );

} // if args.length == 0.. else

}
}

Much nicer, more fun, than a compiled-in directory string.